california marijuana initiative,    fly fishing media,    legalizing marijuana,    marijuana bust,    News,    stienstra,    tom stienstra

Outdoor Writer Tom Stienstra Busted For Marijuana Cultivation in Weed (or, Ooops!)

Posted by Tom Chandler 4/2/2010 5 minutes

Well-known California outdoor writer Tom Stienstra apparently loves the outdoors so much, he decided to bring a little of the leafy green indoors, though his choice of flora leaves a little to be desired.

blog sign up

Last week, he was busted for marijuana possession at his Weed home (the Underground is trying very hard - very hard - not to comment on the irony of that one) for what Siskiyou County sheriffs are calling a "sophisticated cultivation operation."

Ooops.

Popular outdoor writer arrested in Weed -- Redding Record Searchlight

Popular outdoor writer and author Tom Stienstra has been arrested on suspicion of possessing marijuana for sale, according to the Siskiyou County Sheriff's Office.

Stienstra, 55, was arrested March 25 after sheriff's deputies served a search warrant at his home in Weed and found a "sophisticated cultivation operation" in his barn, sheriff's office spokeswoman Susan Gravenkamp said in an e-mail.

Deputies allegedly found 31 immature marijuana plants, 29 mature marijuana plants and 11 pounds of processed marijuana, Gravenkamp said.

Much of the processed marijuana was packaged, Gravenkamp said. Deputies also found scales, packaging material and other paraphernalia at Stienstra's barn and inside his home, she said.

Stienstra is an outdoor writer for the San Francisco Chronicle and syndicated newspaper columnist. He is also an author of numerous books on hiking, camping and the outdoors. He has a weekly television show on KBCW/KMAX in Sacramento and a weekly radio program on KCBS in San Francisco.Stienstra and three others were booked into the Siskiyou County jail in Yreka. Stienstra was released last Friday on $75,000 bail. He continues to write for the San Francisco Chronicle.

I heard murmurings of this a couple days ago, though even I'm surprised by the size of the operation.

Stienstra's something of an institution in California, though I won't pretend he's universally loved by the state's conservation groups, nor many of the locals.

(Can't resist: He was busted in Weed. For weed! The universe isn't entropy, it's irony.)

If only he'd waited; California is heading towards a November vote which could legalize marijuana use (California: The "Like Dude, Chill" State).

See you at the legal blotter, Tom Chandler.

UPDATE:
The SF Chronicle has published a story, though it (perhaps not surprisingly) seems more supportive of Stienstra than the Redding report:

Stienstra, 55, and Cruickshank, 54, were booked into county jail on suspicion of one felony count each of possession of drugs for sale. Also arrested on suspicion of the same crimes were Henry Warren Lincoln, 32, of Medford, Ore., and Nathan Jacob Koopman, 30, of Gazelle (Siskiyou County).

Stienstra posted $75,000 bail March 26 and was released. His wife and the other two suspects were released Monday after no charges were filed against them.

County Assistant District Attorney Christine Winte said, "The D.A. has decided not to file charges at this time" against any of the suspects.

She said her office intends to have Stienstra in court for a proceeding in the case, but she could not give a date.

"The whole thing is under review," Winte said.

Stienstra's and Cruickshank's lawyers said they were hopeful the matter will go no further.

"All I know is that charges were not filed," said Eric Bergstrom of Yreka, Stienstra's lawyer. "That's very good news."

Chronicle Editor and Executive Vice President Ward Bushee said Stienstra's job has not changed at the paper. Stienstra covers the outdoors for The Chronicle, has a program on radio station KCBS and has published several books on hiking and camping.

"There are no charges filed, and we know very little about the allegations against Tom and hope it is resolved quickly," Bushee said. "In the meantime, we will continue to publish his popular outdoor reports in the Sporting Green."

As of this writing, there are more than 230 comments below the Chronicle story, some of them frankly hilarious, including:

THAT EXPLAINS why I get the munchies after reading his articles.


That's one way to plan for the demise of the Chronicle.

Many of the others make me fear for the republic, but newspaper comments have that tendency.
Destinations
 (1)
Nestled in the north end of the Sacramento Valley, Shasta County and its three Cities - Redding, Anderson, and Shasta Lake - are 545 miles north of Los Angeles; 162 miles north of ... moreSacramento; 433 miles south of Portland, Oregon; and 592 miles south of Seattle, Washington.

In 2004, as an effort to increase tourism in the area, the Sundial Bridge, designed by world-renowned architectural designer Santiago Calatrava, was completed. The Sundial Bridge casts its gnomon shadow upon a dial to the north of the bridge accurately once a year during the Summer Solstice. With the objective of providing pedestrian access to the north and south of Turtle Bay Exploration Park, the Sundial Bridge has not only lived up to its purpose but has also become an icon for the City of Redding in the present day.

Redding is one of the best places to launch for Trophy Rainbow Trout & Trophy Steelhead Fishing in Northern California. A number of great rivers are within an easy drive and local guides can on any given day help you figure out where the fishing is great.

The Klamath river, Sacaramento river, Trinity River and the Feather river are all being frequented by local guides and fly fisher.
Fishing Waters
The American River watershed offers fishermen (and fisherwomen) a wide range of experiences, from fly-fishing in the clear streams of the Sierra Nevada to casting for steelhead in ... morethe lower American as it flows through Sacramento. The American River contains two main sections. The North Fork and the Lower American River

//

The North Fork of the American River is designated as a while trout water. Most of the North Fork flows through a deep canyon carved through metamorphic rock. It has a very rugged character with very steep slopes and a narrow bottom. Deep pools framed by sheer cliffs, waterfalls cascading from 40 to 70 feet, and benches, densely wooded with alder and willow are typical of the beauty found in the North Fork Canyon. The fishery is dominated by Rainbow trout, with an occasional Brown trout (the brown trout are usually lunkers!).

Fishing enthusiasts can choose from a number of trails to access the river canyon, most of them dropping steeply from the canyon rim down to the water. While visitation peaks in the summer, primarily driven by hikers/swimmers, late spring into mid-summer is typically the height of the boating season. The highest boatable reach is known as Generation Gap (12 miles), run by only the most experienced Class V boaters, which can only be accessed by a three-mile long walk. The next lower reach, known as Giant Gap (14 miles), is also Class V and is accessed by a two-mile hike down the Euchre Bar Trail. Although overnight camping permits are not required, if visitors want a campfire, they will need to obtain a fire permit.

The Lower American River is a short stretch of river, flowing through the city of Sacramento, is the most heavily used recreation river in California. It provides an urban greenway for trail and boating activities and is also known for its runs of steelhead trout and salmon.
Putah Creek is a major stream in Northern California, a tributary of the Yolo Bypass. The 85-mile-long (137 km) creek has its headwaters in the Mayacamas Mountains, a part of the Coast ... moreRange. The true meaning of "Putah" in Putah Creek has been the subject of discussion and speculation.

The creek originates from springs on the east side of Cobb Mountain south of the town of Cobb in southwestern Lake County. It descends eastward to the town of Whispering Pines, where it turns southeast, parallelling State Route 175. It passes the town of Anderson Springs, where it joins Bear Canyon Creek. North of Middletown, it curves counterclockwise around Harbin Mountain, merging in close succession with Dry Creek, Helena Creek, Crazy Creek, Harbin Creek, and Big Canyon Creek. From Harbin Mountain, it flows east again, joining Bucksnort Creek, then enters Napa County at a confluence with Hunting Creek about 11 mi (18 km) east of Middletown. In Napa County, the creek flows southeast, merging with Butts Creek just before it empties into Lake Berryessa.

//

Downstream of Monticello Dam, on the southeastern corner of the lake, Putah Creek leaves Napa County and becomes the boundary between Yolo County and Solano County. In this section it offers excellent fishing opportunities year round. California Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations require "catch and release" in this section of the stream, as well as the use of artificial lures with barbless hooks. The stream continues east along State Route 128, receiving Pleasants Creek before arriving at Lake Solano where the Putah Diversion Dam diverts flows to the Putah South Canal, carrying water to the residents of Vallejo. Below Lake Solano, Putah Creek receives McCune Creek, then its last tributary, Dry Creek. After the Dry Creek confluence it passes through the town of Winters to reach Interstate 505. From there Putah Creek channel continues eastward, parallelling Putah Creek Road to Stevenson Bridge Road.

Putah Creek used to flow near downtown Davis in what is now the UC Davis Arboretum channel, but early settlers redirected the creek south of Davis in 1871, and in the late 1940s the Army Corps of Engineers added levees to what is now the South Fork Putah Creek. A few miles east of Davis, the county line turns south, but the South Fork Putah Creek continues eastward, passing south of Davis to feed into the Yolo Bypass about a quarter mile (400 m) west of the Sacramento Deep Water Channel.

Steelhead trout (coastal rainbow trout) (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) continue to survive in Putah Creek. Although these anadromous salmonids cannot pass the Putah Diversion Dam, stream resident rainbow trout continue to thrive above Monticello Dam in the upper headwaters and grow to large size in the first few miles directly below the dam. In December 2014, the California Fish and Game Commission designated Putah Creek a "Wild Trout Water" and efforts by citizen groups to restore the creek appear to be resulting in increased salmon rearing in the lower watershed.
Game Fish Opportunities:
The McCloud River and its tributaries offer excellent fishing opportunities. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regularly stocks the Upper McCloud River at Lower Falls ... morewith Rainbow trout. Anglers also occasionally catch German brown trout from earlier stockings or those that traveled up from the McCloud Reservoir, and Brook trout. Remember that the Bull Trout or Dolly Varden is an endangered species and should be released if caught.

//

The Lower McCloud River, from McCloud Reservoir to Shasta Lake, has been designated a Wild Trout Stream by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. This portion of the river is not artificially stocked and has special fishing regulations. Only artificial flies and lures with barbless hooks can be used. At the McCloud River Preserve, located one mile below Ah-Di- Na Campground, fishing is limited to catch and release only. Consult the map on the back, and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife Regulations for further details and restrictions.

Endangered species - The McCloud River is the only fishery in California which supports the now rare Bull Trout, also known as the Dolly Varden Trout. Actually a member of the Char family, it is found between Lower Falls and Shasta Lake. Because it is considered an endangered species by the State of California, it must be released if caught.
Game Fish Opportunities:
Trips
$
225
/ Angler
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
1 day
Our guided fly-fishing trips include 8 hours or more spent pursuing steelhead. Your leaders and Fly's are included in the price of the trip. You are welcome to bring your own tackle ... moreif you prefer.

Fishing the rivers of the North Coast we utilize several different methodologies to pursue steelhead. The most poplar and most widely practiced is utilizing one of many fly's such as a Copper John or similar type offering with a dropper and a glo bug. We utilize 4-6 weight rods.
$
300
-
$
400
/ Angler
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
4 hours - 1 day
With our extensive experience fishing the Truckee River, we have the vast knowledge needed to guide you on the Truckee River and have fun doing it. We have specialized in fishermen ... moreof all types from first-time anglers, to experts.
$
325
-
$
450
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
4 hours - 8 hours
Fly Fishing the American River will leave even the most advanced fly fisherman wanting more. That is why a knowledgable American River Fly Fishing Guide will not only educate you on ... morethe river sytem and its species, but show you the ins and outs, when, where, why, how and with what. Whether you are swinging for steelhead on the Lower American River or dry fly fishing the South Fork American River, you will be pleasantly pleased with the results.

The American River system is where you can start out fishing the Lower American River for shad, striper or steelhead while wet wading on a summer morning, then go eat lunch, get back on the road shoot up hwy 50 and within 45 minutes, have 30 fish on the South Fork American River fishing drys. Fishing the American River is one that can satisfy any fly fishing crave. The Lower American River is known for its shad, striper, steelhead and salmon runs. Shad start to enter the river in late spring, with some entering as early as April, the fishing starts to pick up in late May and early June, with July being the best. Even though the migration has ended the fishing can be great on those late July summer nights. If you have never fought a shad on a fly rod, I highly suggest it, they don’t call it the poor man’s tarpon for nothing. There are two methods used when shad fishing, one is swinging flys specifically tied for shad, the other is drifting flies under an indicator. Either technique is productive when used properly.

As far as stripers go, there are some resident fish in the river system year round, but can be extremely hard to catch due to the lack of numbers. When the weather warms so does the water as well as the Striper migration. The stripers start entering the river in early April and they are in the river system through September. Your best numbers in the lower part of the river is between April and May. June is a little slower due to the amount of shad that are in the river system and the stripers actively feeding on them, but once the shad are gone the fishing really heats up from late July through August, September and sometimes even October depending on the weather and water conditions. The best technique used for stripers is by stripping or swinging clousers with sink tips, full sinks and shoot head lines.

Now for the Steelhead, half pounders can be year round, but are mostly caught from late summer to spring. They can be caught using many techniques, from swinging to nymphing and even throwing drys. The best months to be on the water for half pounders are August through October along with March April and May. Don’t be discouraged by the word half pounder, this was the original run before the Eel and Mad river strain (winter run steelhead) was introduced in the 70's. These guys can put up a real fight for their size and most half pounders are wild fish ranging from 16-22" some even pushing 5 pounds and they are always full of spunk. The winter run doesn’t start showing up until the beginning of October, this is also peak time for the salmon run. The winter run steelhead that are on the American came from the Eel and Mad River systems, that was introduce by DFG to protect the steelhead population after the dams where e rected. These fish can be caught throughout the length of river from mid October all the way through March, sometimes even April. These fish range anywhere from 5 to 15 pounds. As far as fishing techniques goes, these big boys can be caught with the same techniques used on their half brothers, just scaled up a bit. If you want to get into steelhead and don't want to travel severals hours and possibly get a big goose egg, the American River is where its at. Not only is it our back yard, but we have 30+ years fishing this river system and we know where these fish hold throughout the year. Come enjoy some backyard fishing on a great river like the American river.

-Brian-
Outfitters
If you enjoy sport fishing with light tackle for trophy salmon and steelhead then come along with us for the trip of a lifetime. During the months of August, September, October, November, ... moreDecember and January the Klamath river is one of the hottest places to be if you are looking for an exciting day of trophy salmon and steelhead fishing. 

We offer trips for all types of fisherman and we even cater to those who just want to go for a jet boat ride in the scenic Klamath Valley to catch a glimpse of the fabulous scenery and spectacular wildlife. Our boat is a North River center console with seating for 4 and equipped with the latest rods and tackle from Rogue Rods, Gamakatsu and Fish Pills just to name a few.

AuthorPicture

Tom Chandler

As the author of the decade leading fly fishing blog Trout Underground, Tom believes that fishing is not about measuring the experience but instead of about having fun. As a staunch environmentalist, he brings to the Yobi Community thought leadership on environmental and access issues facing us today.

24 comments
[…] Stienstra took exception to the Underground mentioning his apparent 2010 Marijuana bust, and chose to flex a bit of judicial muscle, albeit a bit tardy given the […]
0
0
[…] Trout Underground is a really good blog out of Siskiyou County. Tom Stienstra is an outdoor columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle who was arrested in Siskiyou County three […]
0
0
[…] Tom Stienstra filed a $10,000 suit against me in Siskiyou County small claims court, alleging my short article about his marijuana-related arrest is […]
0
0
Stienstra once published the location of my secret hole in the Chronicle! (that's libel right there) Sue me.
0
0
people love to fly fish dont we? well, some of us love smoking marijuana. that many plant's may not be what the judge may see as a personal grow. try two plant's next time, and keep fly fishing people. thing's like this really happen in our word. hold on, it could be much worse. eveyone have wonderful day's night's on the stream's. ps be safe and careful.
0
0
All this over a little (!!!) dope and a dope? I think that I'm glad that I live on the right coast for a change. Feel the love.
0
0
The snarkmeisters at the GetOutdoors blog send a little attitude Stienstra's way in their "Top 10 Stienstra Hikes" post.
0
0
[...] for growing weed, is huge. Mostly because I have yet another reason to admire the guy. Granted, he’s rumored to rub people the wrong way, but hell so is yours truly. Crazy thing is the article about the bust claims there were scales and [...]
0
0
420 was coined by the Waldos at San Rafael High School in 71. How do I know that? Why do I know that?
0
0
Wow, you guys are such bitches! And wow, that's just so expressive.
0
0
Over 415 comments at the Chronicle story (and growing fast). Most are calling for legalization, though - shockingly - I haven't yet read one calling for Mr. Stienstra to write a gardening column...
0
0
Wow, you guys are such bitches!
0
0
secret gov. code.... ask your buddy Roberts or Chris...quietly please
0
0
YDMDNIMD Explain, please.
0
0
You guessed it Chris...guess I can't stop for coffee in that town again.
0
0
YDMDNIMD
0
0
This is funny,he didn't do me any favors in July of 2000,A dear friend and I went on a secret fly fishing trip to Jardines de la Reina,it was and still is illegal to travel there, I was careful who I told,all my family from marin and sonoma figured I was going on another bonefish trip,I get back home to Idaho and the calls start,seems there is a half page color photo of me and my name right there ... more for all to see in the sunday sports section,I never met him before,but spent a week on a live a board boat,never cared for him then or now
0
0
From now on, Stienstra will be know as "The Beard that Tokes".
0
0
And I've even spared you folks the sadly true story about the alleged "Outdoor Writer" who gets it so consistently wrong that he was railing against the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement for the effect it was already having on Upper Klamath Irrigators, apparently unaware the agreement's not in effect. (If it was, the irrigators would have more water.) Or how he recently identified Mt. Shasta as ... more the city selling water to Nestle (instead of McCloud). It gets worse from there. Really, it's a profession we can all be proud of, especially when you read Frank Galusha's crap in your hometown paper every week... At least I'm not bitter...
0
0
Yeah, I shouldn't speculate either, but it does make me wonder. I guess they'll be an opening at the Chron, Tom... I understand the newspaper business is the place to be.
0
0
I haven't followed the legalization issue much - the poll numbers really suggest it'll pass? It's clear the Governator has a revenue angle... And I'm pretty sure the effluent from his operation in Weed would run to the Klamath instead of the Upper Sac. I'd guess it would make them happier, not bigger...
0
0
Well, well, yesterday we had talking fish and now outdoor writers single handedly helping glaucoma suffers in Siskiyou County; from a town named Weed. What's next serial fornicating Pro Golfers…
0
0
... and I fully expect that to pass this go round, which makes you wonder what he'll be thinking (prior to his early release so the Governor can save money) when he cracks the newspaper six months later to find Phillip Morris has bought most of Mendocino county. I just hope the effluent from all that lush growth makes the fish larger ...
0
0
It's real. A well-placed Underground Source tipped us a couple days ago, but I didn't have the time to follow up. I know the SF Chronicle had the story too.
0
0

Discover Your Own Authentic Fly Fishing Experience

With top destinations, guided trips, outfitters and guides, and river reports, you have everything you need.