Mettawee River Fishing Report

A mere five miles from Manchester, this freestone, spring-fed river, like the Battenkill, begins, near Dorset in Vermont’s Green Mountains. A tributary of Lake Champlain, the 28-mile long Mettawee is among Vermont’s most highly regarded trout streams, boasting 500 fish per mile.  The landscape along the 16-mile stretch of river that runs through Vermont, is dotted with rolling hills and charming farm houses, providing a postcard view of New England.
 
To access the upper part of the stream follow Lower Hollow Road out of Dorset.  At its headwaters, you can expect to find native brook and rainbow trout. Following state highway #30 offers river access as do its several bridges.  The mid-section of the river is made up largely of long rifles and pools. Pocket water here is scarce and the currents are mild. Continuing down, the landscape changes from farm to forest. In the lower section of the river you will find both browns and rainbows, some of which were stocked by the state in prior years.
 
The best time to fish is late May and June. The summer months can be difficult so if you fish at this time, most guides recommend moving into some of the Mettawee’s many tributaries where the water is likely to be cooler. By the middle of September the weather begins to cool down and its possible to return to the main course of the river. Motivated by the impetus to spawn, the fish tend to be hungrier and less particular, making them easier to catch. Given the narrow width of the river, at some points a mere 20 feet across, it is easily waded and can be fished with relatively short rods.
 
Before booking a trip on the Mettawee, inquire about variations in seasonal water temperatures and remember that you must return all fish between 10-14 inches.
 
Tributaries:
The Mettawee River is a tributary of Lake Champlain
Source:
Green Mountains near Dorset
Mouth:
Lake Champlain
Length:
28 miles
Seasonal Conditions
Season
Hatches
SpringMidges, minnows and sculpin
SummerBWO, yellow & golden drake, hendrickson, Am. march br., cream cahill, light cahill, sulfur dun, pale morn. & eve. dun, trico, caddis, sedge
FallBWO, trico, terrestrials, minnows, sculpin
WinterMinnows, midges, sculpin
Game Fish Opportunities
Fishing Trips
Its "Spring Forward Day" with the clock change this morning. Longer days, stronger sun, and thoughts and plans for the upcoming season are on my mind this morning. Usually at this ... moretime I am busy finishing my winter job in the ski industry and madly getting ready to head to Michigan for the spring Steelhead season. This will be the second year I will not be going west and concentrating my guiding on the local waters of southern VT and nearby NY.

What a winter!! Or should I say a "non-winter"!!! Virtually no snow, wide temperature swings, and many days above freezing all culminating in the warmest winter on record for my home state of Vermont!!! As I write this report there is no snow cover and our temps have been averaging 15-20 F above normal Usually when the fishing season opens (early April) ours streams are high and cold from snow melt so our hatches and spring fishing doesn't get going till early May. NOT THIS YEAR, IT WILL BE UNUSUALLY EARLY DUE TO THESE RECENT CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. The local ski areas will close soon and I will have plenty of time to prep, tie flies, and work on my small water targets, walking/scouting and pruning that critical branch to get a good cast in a tight spot.
Destination:
This is mainly a small, quick freestone creek. Unstocked since 1970, it holds a good population of wild rainbow and wild brown trout. Easy to wade, with good hatches all season long, ... morethis is a great classroom for the beginning or experienced fly fisher.
Destination:
Current Forecast
Water Flow
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Fishing Quality
Scenery
Access
Water quality

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