Chinook Salmon

Type:
Fresh Water, Salt Water
One of two Pacific salmon species in Montana, the chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), was introduced into Fort Peck Reservoir during the 1980s in an effort to produce a trophy fishery. Like all Pacific salmon species, the chinook dies after spawning. It is doubtful that these fish will reproduce in Fort Peck, but due to their intense homing instinct they will return to where they were stocked when they are ready to spawn. They may then be captured and artificially propagated in the hatchery. While still experimental, chinooks of over 25 pounds have already been captured in Montana. Chinook, also known as "king salmon", are intense fish predators as adults.
 
Fishing Waters
Like other rivers in the Rangeley region, the Kennabago begins at Big Island Pond near the Maine/Quebec border and ends in a lake – in this case Mooselookmeguntic Lake – about a 25-mile ... morelong run. And, like other rivers in the area, it is chock full of wild brooks and landlocked Atlantic salmon. What’s different is that it is also home to wild brown trout. Ask anyone who has fished near Rangeley and they’ll tell you that the Kennabago is the third best brook trout river in the state and might rank higher if it were more accessible.

The upper Kennabago starts at Big Island Pond and flows for about 12 miles before flowing through the west end of Kennabago Lake. Described as scenic and remote, this section is mostly gated, although you may gain access through a guide or by paying a fee. It is possible to wade at the junction of Little Kennabago Lake and the river, as a substantial sandbar extends several yards into the lake. During the spring and fall seasons, the brook trout are ample and active every hour of the day.

While fish remain in the river all year long, each spring and fall large brook and landlocked salmon migrate out of the lake and into the lower river in great quantity. Here access is very good between Steep Pool Bank and Mooselookmeguntic Lake. Open from April through September, the entire river and its tributaries are available for fly fishing only. Limitations on fish are fairly strict – 2 trout with a minimum length of 10 inches and only 1 can be in excess of 12 inches. The limit on salmon is one. After August 15th the river becomes catch and release only, with its tributaries closed to fishing to safeguard spawning.

Anglers looking for another type of experience will find Kennabago Lake interesting. It is thought to be the first fly-fishing-only lake in Maine (since the 1920s) and is commonly assumed to be the largest east of the Mississippi. Getting there can be a challenge since there are no paved roads and access can be difficult. Deemed a Wilderness Gem Lake, it is one of a mere five in the state with that designation. Brooks range from 10-14 inches accompanied by a healthy population of salmon. Though not as common, wild brown trout, five pounds and greater, are found here as well.
Game Fish Opportunities:
A stones throw from the town of Rangley is what most anglers consider the second best, native brook trout fishery in the country – the Magalloway River. A tributary of the Androscoggin ... moreRiver, the Magalloway begins near the Canadian border and flows south for 30 miles (including distances over intervening lake water) through northwestern Maine and New Hampshire. Like other rivers in the Rangeley area, the Magalloway is interrupted first by Parmachenee Lake and then 2 1/2 miles later, by Aziscohos Lake, a narrow, 15-mile long body of water.

Privately owned property makes access difficult on the northern reaches of the river as it runs through harvested forestland. Where public access is available, it is best fished by wading or by canoe as this section is more of a small stream loaded with rifles and pools. Because pressure here is light, the fish are thought to be naïve and unaccustomed to seeing flies. Beginners in search of wild native brook or wild landlocked salmon should find this a great place to learn and gain confidence.

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Magalloway’s mid section is rife with pools that drain into Parmachenee Lake, followed by a mile of deep pools and pocket water before reaching Aziscohos Lake. The dam at Aziscohos provides steady flows of cold water great for trout habitat. But what brings fishermen to the river section between the two lakes, are the extremely large lake fish that appear several times a year to take advantage of spring smelt or fall spawning.

The terrain after Aziscohos Lake is quite steep; the river descends over 250 feet in less than 2 miles, creating fast water, riffles and deep pools. Open from April through September, the entire river is fly fishing only and only barbless hooks can be used below the lake. South of the lake, fishing is restricted to catch-and-release for brook trout; north of the lake there is a 2 fish limit where fish less than 6 inches long and fish longer than 12 inches must be immediately set back into the water.
Game Fish Opportunities:
Short and swift is how many describe this freestone river - and they are not wrong. Although it’s only 6 miles long it is widely considered the best native Eastern brook trout river ... morein the US. Surrounded by dense forest and scores of lakes, the Rapid is part of the Androscoggin watershed and river system, an area known for outdoor sports and recreation. Aptly named, the river drops over 800 feet from its start in Lower Richardson Lake to its end at Umbago Lake, the steep incline accounting for its abundant whitewater.

Despite its short length, fishermen think of it in three sections – the Upper Dam, Middle Dam and Lower Dam. Getting to the Upper Dam requires a half-mile hike but the trek is worth it. Here there are large numbers of both brook trout and landlocked Atlantic salmon to be found in the deep water. Below Middle Dam (below Lower Richardson Lake) you’ll find fast pocket water that can be easily accessed by local roads and trails. At Lower Dam, water backs up into a 500-acre pool known as Pond in the River, providing access to the river’s finest fishing, the 2.5 miles between the Dam and Umbagog Lake.

Once stocked with Atlantic salmon, the salmon have successfully adapted and breed on their own, to the extent that now they are all wild. With the exception of Pond in the River where boats are necessary, the Rapid is a wading river. By New England measures, the season tends to start early, typically opening on April 1 and fully active by mid-May. September is considered the best time to fish. Brook trout in the 12 to 16 inch range are plentiful although 18 -20 inchers are not that uncommon. Salmon tend to average 12-14 inches. Fishing is restricted to barbless hooks and fly fishing only. Brook trout are restricted to catch–and-release only. Salmon is limited to 3 fish with a 12-inch minimum.
Game Fish Opportunities:
The American River watershed offers fishermen (and fisherwomen) a wide range of experiences, from fly-fishing in the clear streams of the Sierra Nevada to casting for steelhead in ... morethe lower American as it flows through Sacramento. The American River contains two main sections. The North Fork and the Lower American River

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The North Fork of the American River is designated as a while trout water. Most of the North Fork flows through a deep canyon carved through metamorphic rock. It has a very rugged character with very steep slopes and a narrow bottom. Deep pools framed by sheer cliffs, waterfalls cascading from 40 to 70 feet, and benches, densely wooded with alder and willow are typical of the beauty found in the North Fork Canyon. The fishery is dominated by Rainbow trout, with an occasional Brown trout (the brown trout are usually lunkers!).

Fishing enthusiasts can choose from a number of trails to access the river canyon, most of them dropping steeply from the canyon rim down to the water. While visitation peaks in the summer, primarily driven by hikers/swimmers, late spring into mid-summer is typically the height of the boating season. The highest boatable reach is known as Generation Gap (12 miles), run by only the most experienced Class V boaters, which can only be accessed by a three-mile long walk. The next lower reach, known as Giant Gap (14 miles), is also Class V and is accessed by a two-mile hike down the Euchre Bar Trail. Although overnight camping permits are not required, if visitors want a campfire, they will need to obtain a fire permit.

The Lower American River is a short stretch of river, flowing through the city of Sacramento, is the most heavily used recreation river in California. It provides an urban greenway for trail and boating activities and is also known for its runs of steelhead trout and salmon.
Nestled in the Methow River Valley and known as the Jewel of the Cascades, this 80-mile Columbia tributary is known for its great beauty and abundant trout. By car, it can be reached ... morewithin two hours from Ellensburg or about 3 ½ hours from Seattle. Five towns dot the valley landscape - Mazama, Winthrop Twisp, Carlton and Methow – each with a charm of their own.

The Methow and its tributaries, the Twisp River, Cedar Creek and Early Winters Creek begin in the high, Methow Pass area of the Cascades and continue to join with additional tributaries until their confluence with the Columbia River at Pateros. The Pacific Rim Trail follows the River’s upper reaches while other landmarks such as Star Peak and Mt. Bigelow, two of the state’s highest peaks, add to the river’s splendor.

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The river can be waded or floated. Anglers tend to divide the river into three sections: Winthrop to Twisp; Twisp to Carlton; and, Carlton to Gold Creek. Each has differing flows although the lower section has rapids and tends to be turbulent.

Steelhead season changes annually but the trout season typically opens June 1st and closes September 30th. The section below Winthrop is considered by many to be the most desirable. Dry fishing throughout the summer is excellent but fall/winter is the best time, especially for those interested in steelhead. Still something of an insider’s river, the clear watered Methow is often overlooked by anglers and is rarely congested.

Species include wild rainbow trout, wild cutthroat, native bull trout, steelhead (indigenous and hatched) and chinook salmon. While fish tend to average about 12 inches, there are recent reports of 18-25 inch trout being found southeast of Carlton.

Before booking a trip, check to see if the river is closed for spawning and if all fish need to be released. Depending on conditions, anglers may be permitted to keep hatchery steelhead.
The Klickitat River, located in south-central Washington, flows generally south from its origin on Mt. Adams in the high country of the Yamaka Indian Reservation to its confluence ... morewith the Columbia River in the Columbia River Gorge. The designated segment is the lowermost 10.8 miles of the river. At the upper end of this segment, the river flows through a broad canyon. As it drops toward the Columbia at a steady gradient of 26 feet per mile, the canyon tightens and small rapids spike the channel.

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At about river mile 2.5, the Klickitat drops into a tight, rock-walled gorge. The water cascades and crashes through the rocky channel where the tribes and bands of the Yamaka Nation have used dip-net fishing continuously for generations to catch salmon and steelhead. Of the mid-Columbia tributaries, the Klickitat is one of the favored fishing sites, due to both the number of fish and the narrow canyon with its high water volume.

In addition to the river's outstanding hydrology, the geology of the gorge between river mile 1.1 and 2.5, and the dip-net fishing sites, the river is also the most significant anadromous fishery on the Washington side of the Columbia in the stretch from Bonneville Dam to the Snake River. It supports steelhead trout, Chinook salmon and coho salmon, with six distinct runs.

The lower Klickitat offers a variety of recreation opportunities, including boating, fishing, hiking, camping and sightseeing. Boat fishing is popular when the salmon and steelhead are running. There is an undeveloped boat put-in/take-out on Klickitat County Park land just below the Pitt bridge, and river access at several places along Highway 142, including a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife fee camp site. The take-out is before the fish screw trap at about river mile 5, just above the Klickitat canyon gorge. Ongoing construction of the fish bypass at the top of Lyle Falls requires boaters to take out at this point. The falls also marks the beginning of the tribal in-lieu fishing sites and no boating is allowed through this area.

The only permits required are from commercial outfitters; existing commercial outfitters include beginning kayak schools and fishing guides.

The Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railroad built a railway linking Lyle and Goldendale in 1903. This branch line was abandoned in 1992 and is now the Klickitat Rails-to-Trail. The trail parallels the river's east bank from the Columbia River to Fisher Hill Bridge, where it crosses to the west bank and continues to the town of Pitt. It crosses Highway 142 and continues along the west bank leaving the wild and scenic river portion and continues for many miles upriver.
One of the region's most popular rivers for white water rafting and float boating, the McKenzie also offers easy access to world class trout and steelhead fishing. At this site, just ... more30 minutes east of Springfield on Highway 126, don't be suprised if you find yourself sharing the water with osprey, great blue herons, and bald eagles. These and other species are featured at the accessible Silver Creek Watchable Wildlife Site near Vida.

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The Sacramento River is the principal river of Northern California in the United States, and is the largest river in California. Rising in the Klamath Mountains, near Mount Shasta ... more(in Siskiyou county), the river flows south for 445 miles, through the northern section (Sacramento Valley) of the Central Valley, before reaching the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay. It forms a common delta with the San Joaquin River before entering Suisun Bay, the northern arm of San Francisco Bay. The river drains about 27,500 square miles, with an average annual runoff of 22 million acre-feet, in 19 California counties, mostly within a region bounded by the Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada known as the Sacramento Valley, but also extending as far as the volcanic plateaus of Northeastern California.

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From over 13,000 feet on the south side of Mt. Lyell, the Merced River gets off to an icy, cold start. Winding through ancient canyons, carved by glaciers from another age, the river ... moreflows through Yosemite National Park down to the Lake McClure Reservoir. Its journey includes snow-covered peaks, alpine and subalpine meadows and clear, fresh water lakes. Pristine and largely unaffected by outside influences, the South Fork of the river still boasts one of the few self-sustaining populations of rainbow, eastern brook and brown trout.

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Game Fish Opportunities:
More than a river, the Klamath is part of a regional watershed that includes three of its principal tributaries – Wooley Creek, Scott River and the Salmon River. It is one of only ... morethree rivers that bisect the Cascade Mountain Range, traversing a wide range of topography from high desert to coastal rain forest. Beginning approximately three-quarters of a mile below the Iron Gate Dam, the river runs through until it reaches the Pacific Ocean. Administration of the river is split. The upper, 127 miles are managed by the US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management. The State of California, in concert with the National Park Service and various Native American tribes, manage the remainder. All of its tributaries, except a small portion of the Scott are under the purview of the US Forest Service.

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The most notable characteristic of the Klamath is its variety of androgynous fish, supported by the river throughout most of their in-river life stages. These species include Chinook salmon (spring and fall runs) coho salmon, steelhead trout (summer and winter runs) coastal cutthroat trout, green and white sturgeon and Pacific lamprey. The river is also home to a genetically unique population of rainbow trout that have adapted to river’s high temperatures and acidity.

Considered by ecologists to be important to the area’s bio-diversity, the Southern Oregon and Northern California Coast coho are federally listed as endangered species and the Klamath River is a designated, critical habitat. This habitat also provides a home for other endangered fish including Lost River and short-nose suckers. Despite this designation, the river supports a thriving sports fishing industry as well as myriad other uses including white water rafting, birding, hiking and camping. 

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