Too Many Fly Rods: A Portrait Of A Terrible Addiction

Category:
Fly Fishing
bamboo fly rods
fly rods
gear addiction
Added Date:
Thursday, 24 Oct, 2013
Summary
To say the Underground's office is a mess is to give messes a black eye. A stack of computers fills one corner while two architect's blueprint racks fill the other (they're holding rod tubes).
 
Content

Fall is when everything happens at once -- including denial.

To say the Underground's office is a mess is to give messes a black eye. A stack of computers fills one corner while two architect's blueprint racks fill the other (they're holding rod tubes). Bookcases line the back wall and my actual work stuff -- desk, Linux-powered PC, random piles of paper, etc -- occupies most of the middle.

In between lies the detritus generated by what I'll grandly suggest is An Outdoorsman On A Fall Tear. After all, Fall is the season where everything happens at once. Call it an assault on the space/time continuum.

fly rod tubes It's time someone spoke out about the terrible toll taken by... fly rod storage abuse... 

In one big pile, I've got recently used fly rods and my fly fishing gear duffel (a smaller pile to the left holds M1's fly rod and tiny pack).

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In another pile, I've heaped targets and shooting gear (oddly, I won two local shooting competitions the last couple months, and with only one or two matches left until next spring, I'm practicing).

And after a two-year hiatus, I'm again shooting the Bogey Charity Sporting Clays tourney (Sunday, November 3, and it's for a good cause), so two cartons of bright orange, biodegradable clay birds -- and the machine that throws them -- sit right in the middle of the floor.

Frankly, you need advanced survival skills just to make it to my desk.

Too Much Gear; Too Many Fly Rods

What I'm politely calling "The Disorder Issue" came to a head a few weeks ago when I had a 90 minute window for fishing. Sadly, I spent 15 of those precious minutes looking for a specific fly rod in the rod rack.

It's possible a less hard-headed fly fisherman would have gone with whatever was on the top of the pile. And a more organized one would have put the rod back into the right tube in the first place.

Given that my office looks like an exploded sporting goods superstore, I'm clearly prone to learning a different lesson.

It's time to thin the fly rod herd.

Tellingly, in just the "small to medium stream bamboo fly rod" category I've got two James Beasely built 8' 5wts and a 7.5' 4wt. And two (identical) 8' 5wt impregnated Phillipson Peerless rods and a somewhat lighter-tipped 8' 5wt Phillipson Premium. Plus a 7'9" Para-14 (blank built by Mark Ruhe), and an 8' 5wt prototype of Raine's best-selling Upper Sac Special.

That's just the cane.

In the fiberglass bin I can see a mind-boggling dozen fly rods in the small stream club (to get an accurate count, I had to go downstairs and look at the rod rack). In graphite, there are four more contenders.

For those of you who are not math savants, that's 24 potential small stream fly rods, all of which are hiding in tubes (many of which are generic PVC).

Add the embarrassing number of longer/heavier fly rods, and things start to look a little grim in the denial department. (How many 8.5' fly rods do I own?? Are they reproducing in there?)

Hi, I'm Tom, And I'm A Rodaholic...

I'll admit to emotional attachments to a lot of my rods, but I can identify at least ten really nice fly rods that remain sadly underfished.

The powerful, tight-loop throwing 8.5' 5wt Thramer hollowbuilt is wonderful, but I don't live in a windy environment or fish long distances from a drift boat enough to use it. Same goes for the 8' 6/7 wt Dickerson Guide Special built by Gary Williams, which caught a 16" Upper Sac rainbow trout the first time out, and hasn't been fished since.

Read More The Underground Picks the Dozen Best Fly Rods of All Time Period

The 8' South Fork fiberglass 5/6 wt has never been fished, and for that matter, do I really need three 8.5' Phillipson 5wts (two of which are Premiums)? Shouldn't that 8.5' 5wt Diamondback Classic go to someone who will fish it?

I suspect these are the kind of questions almost every fly fisherman asks at one point or another, though I get the impression most do it privately -- before pretending the whole inner monologue never took place.

This is starting to take on the tenor of a confessional, which makes this next bit even worse.

I don't have all the rods I want.

Chris Raine's 8' 4wt is a stunner. I can't afford one at the moment, but whenever I walk into the shop, I casually look over the rod rack in the hopes of finding an 8' 4wt, thinking I'll cleverly distract him before taking off with the rod ("Look over there at that thing which is nowhere near the rod rack!")

Problem is, every time he finishes one he sells it immediately. He recently built one to order and cunningly crafted another at the same time, figuring he'd finally get one for the rod rack.

It sold before the varnish dried. Thus, my life of crime remains on hold.

In addition to my cane rod lust, we're seeing a raft of new fiberglass fly rods (from Redington, Orvis and Echo). It's only fair they get a trial. And the Steffen 8' 3/4 wt fiberglass fly rod (the maker's favorite) still beckons. As does the 8' 2wt Orvis Superfine Touch.

Fortunately, I can quit any time I want.

Blame The Other Guy

At least I'm not alone.

Just a week after the Frantic Rod Search, I had an email exchange with fellow gear whore Cameron Mortenson of Fiberglass Manifesto fame, who allowed that maybe he'd also collected a few too many rods. Still, I admire his artful avoidance of the problem; he said maybe if I decided to stage my own intervention he'd do it too.

That's basically one addicted gambler betting one someone else's addiction -- a wholly artful dodge worth at least a salute, if not a drink.

Still, the concept of a lean, mean fly rod rack is a seductive one; even with a 90-minute timer running on a trip, I could saunter up to the rod rack, unburdened by uncertainty or the greatly reduced chances of a misplaced fly rod.

I would be the master of my own fly rod domain. I would rule my fly rods (instead of apparently the opposite).

Attractive thought, but as we know, money corrupts. And the money raised from the sale of those unused fly rods would -- as the Greeks taught us -- come back to haunt me (like Client Eastwood in High Plains Drifter, only less organized).

After all, I never did buy that sporting clays shotgun. Or the German-made 10-meter airgun. And let's not forget the list of rods above. Or all the goodies surrounding the outdoor sports.

I wouldn't stand a chance.

In other words, in terms of outdoor sporting equipment, the Lord may taketh away (mostly via eBay), but he has a tendency to giveth back, and in ways that clutter your storage space even worse.

Read More Big Fall Fishing

See you at the rod rack, Tom Chandler.
 
Reading Time:
5minutes
Featured:
No
Author
Destinations
 (2)
This is a small town with a big heart, a veritable fisherman’s paradise. Located near the fish-filled Madison River, and surrounded by the waters of Ennis Lake, the Ruby River, Hebgen ... moreLake, Quake Lake, Henry’s Lake, the Big Hole River and scores of smaller streams, the town boasts what many consider the best trout fishing in the world. As well known for its wranglers as its anglers, Ennis has succeeded in maintaining the look and feel of its original, gold town roots. Warm and hospitable, the area offers a wide variety of accommodations ranging from simple campsites, rustic motels and gracious hotels, to full-service, luxury resorts. Fly shops are numerous, stocked by local experts ready to advise and assist, while guides can be booked for trips throughout the area.

Boredom is the only thing unavailable in Ennis. Throughout the summer season the city hosts a series of events, including its renowned 4th of July Celebration Parade and a genuine, old-fashioned rodeo. In August, fly-fishing luminaries from around the US, flock to Montana to compete in the Madison Fly Fishing Festival. Athletes also find their way to Ennis to compete in the city’s Madison Trifecta, two shorter races followed by a full Marathon at 9000 feet, the highest elevation run in America. For the true sportsman, October falls in with the annual Hunter’s Feed. What’s caught, typically elk, moose deer, pheasant and bobcat, gets cooked on the streets and served up to hungry spectators.

Flanked by three grand mountain ranges, The Tobacco Root, Gravelly and Madison, Ennis is scenic and entertaining – truly an authentic, fly fisher’s haven.
Fishing Waters
 (2)
The Jefferson River is an important part of a system of rivers that combine to form the majestic Missouri. Starting at the confluence of the Big Hole and Beaverhead rivers near Twin ... moreBridges, Montana, it winds 77 miles in a northeasterly fashion to Three Forks. Here, it meets with the Madison and Gallatin rivers that together converge into the Missouri River at the Missouri Headwaters State Park. Like so many other rivers in Montana, the Jefferson, named by Clark in honor of the U.S. President, runs deep with history. In fact, the Jefferson River is a segment of the larger Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, administered by our National Park Service.

When thinking about the Jefferson, a Class 1 river for recreational enjoyment, most observers view the river in three distinct sections. Characterized by slow, meandering flows, the upper third works its way through a broad, arid valley. Along this braided, 44 mile long floodplain, you will encounter working farms, dense cottonwood stands, flowered meadows and a variety of wildlife until you reach the town of Cardwell. Throughout the next 15 miles, its waters flow through a narrow, steep canyon where the water can be deep, slow and contained. As a result, the stretch from Cardwell to the Sappington Bridge has comparatively fewer trees, swamps, meadows and wildlife.

At Sappington Bridge the river once again becomes a circuitous, rambling river, rich in swamp life, colorful fields, large cottonwood groves and productive agricultural land. The presence of significant agriculture has resulted in competition for water use. During dry years, the river was tapped generously for irrigation, dropping water levels to the point where fish populations were adversely affected. Recent improvement in riparian management has tended to alleviate these issues. Primarily known as a brown trout river, rainbows, mountain whitefish, burbot and northern pike can also be found here. Less well known and less discovered, the Jefferson offers the opportunity to catch large fish in a scenic, un-crowded environment.
 (3)
The Big Hole River starts in the Beaverhead Mountains south of Jackson, Montana and flows on for about 156 miles. Beginning as a slight stream, it picks up muscle as it joins with ... morethe North Fork, and draws more volume as it passes through the Wise River basin. At the Continental Divide it changes its northeasterly direction and heads southeast until it joins the Beaverhead and forms the Jefferson River close to the town of Twin Bridges, Montana. It hosts one of the last known habitat for the native fluvial artic grayling but is best known to fly fishers for its trout.

Like so many Montana rivers, the Big Hole is as full of history as it is of water. When Lewis and Clark stumbled upon it, the river was providing a buffer zone between rival Indian tribes vying for land as they sagely anticipated the westward push of European miners, furriers and settlers. Fifty years later, a significant number of the Nez Percé, a tribe that had initially befriended the Expedition, refused to accept life on a reservation and were nearly wiped out by U.S. troops in the Battle of the Big Hole. Today’s battles consist of quarrels between ranchers who desire water for irrigation and recreational users who wish to see the water preserved.

Fishing the river can be basically divided into three sections. From the headwaters at Skinner Lake to Fish Trap, the river meanders slowly through high meadowlands. This is where the few remaining artic grayling can be found, although browns and rainbows are in abundance here. In the second section, Fish Trap to Melrose, you will find boulders and pocket water rushing through a narrow canyon; here rainbows outnumber the browns with an estimated 3000 fish per mile. The final section, Melrose to Twin Bridges, is lined with cottonwood bottoms, braided channels and long, slow pools. In contrast to the second link, browns outnumber rainbows 2 to 1 with approximately 3000 fish per mile.
 (5)
The Madison River is arguably one of the best trout fishing rivers in all of southwest Montana, if not the entire world! It’s certainly the most talked over, written up and frequented ... morein the state of Montana – which is considered by some the capital of fly fishing. Anglers will find plenty of great access sites to wade or float along the Madison’s banks and reservoirs (including Hebgen Lake and Ennis Lake). Rainbows, browns, cutthroats, and more abound in this majestic fishing stream.

//

The Madison begins its course almost twenty miles into Yellowstone National Park. Within the Park, fishing rules apply: no live bait and catch and release only. Once outside the Park the river meanders past working ranches, stately conifer forests and cottonwood lined banks, interrupted by riffles and quiet runs that contain large rainbow and trophy brown trout. Flowing alongside Yellowstone’s West entrance road, the river enters Hebgen Lake, created by Hebgen dam, until it reaches Quake Lake, a bit downstream from the dam. At this point the river is commonly called either the Upper Madison or the Lower Madison, although in fact, they are one and the same.

Upper Madison – Quake Lake to Ennis Lake
Directly below Quake Lake the river roars into 5 long miles of Class V whitewater with steep gradients and large boulders along the way. As the rapids decline, the magic begins. For the next 53 miles, often referred to as the 50 Mile Riffle, the cold river runs north and the fish jump high. Annual runs of spawning trout make their way from Hebgen Lake, rainbows in the spring and browns in the fall. Known the world over for its “hard fighting” trout, it’s not unusual to pull a 25” brown from these upper waters. In deference to the purists and fly-fishing enthusiasts, it’s wading only from Quake Lake to Lyons Bridge. Boats may be used to access the river, but if you’re going to fish, your feet must be on the riverbed. Fortunately, the Hebgen Dam releases water throughout the year, leveling its flows and relieving it of spring runoff issues and summer shrinkage.

Lower Madison – Ennis Lakes to Three Forks
A short section of the river between Ennis Dam and the power station maintains relatively low water levels and provides wonderful opportunities for wading. Past the power station the river regains its muscle and for 7 miles winds through Bear Trap Canyon. Hiking trails offer the only entry, great for those that like to walk and seek the solitude of a designated wilderness area. Floating is permitted but requires a lengthy shuttle and the ability to work through Class III-IV whitewater. Once out of the canyon the river flows in shallow riffles until it reaches Three Forks and joins the Missouri. From Warm Springs to Greycliff, the river is easily accessible for drifters and wading.
Trips
$
495
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
7 hours
A full day float trip on the Jefferson. This trip meets in Ennis, Montana or Twin Bridges Montana. The guide will meet you in Ennis or Twin Bridges and provide transportation for the ... moredrive to the river. The drive from Twin Bridges typically ranges from 5 minutes to 45 minutes and the drive from Ennis to the river typically ranges from 45 minutes to just over an hour. At the boat ramp guides will provide instruction on the days fishing tecniques and launch a drift boat for the float. The guide will provide all the flies and tackle that you need for the day. All you really need to bring is a Montana Fishing license, appropriate clothing and sunglasses for eye protection. The fishing involves floating down the river and casting flies from the boat. Floats are typically around 7 hours of floating but can vary depending on the preference of the customer. All of the fishing is usually done from the boat, which makes wearing waders optional and not at all nessesary. At mid day you will take a break on the bank and enjoy lunch provided by your guide. The Jefferson is a smaller, beautiful braided river that flows through the cottonwoods of the valley. The Jefferson is one of our smaller float rivers and it typically sees much fewer angelers than other rivers which means that you are likely to see only a few other boats during the day. The Jefferson typically will fish well from May through Mid October. May through September are considered the peak season. Trout typically range from 10-20 inches with fish over 20 inches possible. Fish in the 14-17 inch range are normal and the bigger fish of the day typically range from 18-21 inches. The river flows through the scenic Jefferson valley with the Tobacco Root mountain range always in view and moose are frequently sighted on the float. The Jefferson is known as a smaller, less fished river that occassionally produces really large brown trout.
$
400
-
$
495
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
4 hours - 1 day
Destination:
Want to find some of the largest brown trout Montana has to offer? Look no further than the Big Hole River. You may encounter a range of species from brook trout to rainbows, native ... moregraylings, and cutthroats as well but the real prize is the monster browns that are present in September and October. Book a guided float trip with Fishtales Outfitting located in Sheridan Montana and we’ll show you where to land catch of your dreams!
$
500
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
1 day
Destination:
Full day float trip with lunch and flies provided. Come experience the Madison River, one of Montana's most famous trout fisheries, and for good reason. We are located near Ennis for ... moreyour convenience.
Outfitters
Centrally located in Ennis, Montana near many blue ribbon rivers, T Lazy B Ranch is a full-service fishing lodge for people looking for an authentic montana fishing experience. ... more

Our full-service fishing guest ranch offers meals, lodging, and guide service with other activies for family members. With over 40 years of guiding experience, we offer guided float trips on the Madison River, Jefferson River, and Yellowstone River, as well as private fishing on Jack Creek, a creek that runs through the ranch.

T Lazy B Ranch History
Founded in the late 1800's, the T Lazy B Ranch was one of the first ranches homesteaded in the Madison Valley. For years it was a working ranch for sheep and cattle. In the mid-thirties, a lodge and three log cabins were added for guests and the ranch took on another dimension.

Authentic Lodging Experience

Our rustic and cozy cabins are located in an alpine setting on Jack Creek. If you have four or more in your group you will have exclusive use of the ranch. Each cabin sleeps two to four people with a maximum of eight guests. There is a modern, spacious bathhouse within easy walking distance of the cabins. Delicious home-style meals are served in our lodge at fishermen’s hours. Lunches are prepared for your day on the river. After dinner, you may want to relax around the fireplace and discuss plans for the next day.
Type:
Fishing
42 comments
Ha! What, just 5? Oh pul-leeaaze… Try hauling 10+ for a single day outing. That’s when you’ll be just at the cusp of stepping up to the bigs of gear stupidity. Until then my friend, you are just strolling along on your kiddie big wheel tricycle…(lol). All levity aside (I think), I’ve finally decided to try and analyze/articulate why I actually still fall for this gear trap after 25+ years on the job. ... more One thing for sure is that I no longer get out much and hence, feel the need to at least justify any purchase. Secondly, and this is where the crux of the gear stupidity argument comes into play…. More familiarity with the waters that I fish. You see, the more often I fish a particular body of water, the more I start to remember the different pieces of the water. To illustrate with some examples: - “Ooh the 204 or the Merrick 8 ½ footer would be perfect for tossing, drifting, and mending line for size 10 Isonyhias in that nasty slick..” - “I bet with the 10 foot GLX, I could Czech it like a vacuum cleaner in those pockets…” - “Damn it, if I only had my Aroner Spring Creek 7 ½ with me, I’d be able pinpoint one right below that f’en tree…” - “Man, maybe all I really needed was just the IM6 8 ½ or the G series, 9 for a 5. In my defense, my gear stupidity does have some bounds. I’m glad to say that I’ve only attempted something akin to the above, hopefully no greater than 10, 20 times. Oh, and if I really think it through, my stupid move above all else may have been when I purchased a case that would fit that many sticks.
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brooktroutchaser: I have a fear of dying and knowing in-laws and outlaws would sell my rods at a garage sale for ten bucks each.It is time to thin the herd. Just put a Diamondback Classic Trout on eBay. Yeah, I need too thin out the rods too. Given the drought up here and the long string of really hot days, I'm looking at the stack of rods in the corner and realizing I need to winnow them down to ... more a group of rods I could get into the truck in one trip should fire threaten the area.
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I have a fear of dying and knowing in-laws and outlaws would sell my rods at a garage sale for ten bucks each. It is time to thin the herd. Just put a Diamondback Classic Trout on eBay.
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I think I have some 40 rods in all, spinning, fly, baitcasters etc.It took me 40 years to acquire/build them. My wife has been scrapbooking for maybe 5 years and has managed to fill two bookcases with paper/brads/embellishments and other assorted crap. The Internets, they should be forbidden....
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While I'm nowhere near the levels of addiction that you've disclosed, I do have a spare rod or three though purely as a back-up in case tragedy should occur. One mustn't be reckless. Of course, Cameron just advised me on my first glass rod purchase though I have yet to pull the trigger. Something in a five weight though maybe a four would do. Perhaps I could help you and me at the same time though ... more I sense a rabbit hole ahead...
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JP2: A Linus-powered PC?? Does it need a security blanket? Hi. My name's Lucy. Let me hold this football so you can kick it. Don't forget to run as fast as you can before kicking...
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I remember when I had only one fly rod, a 9 foot St.Croix Legend 5 wt.. It was great. Haha. No it wasn't. It sucked.
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And how does my bride feel about my collection? She's a quilter. We have NOTHING on quilters.
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After looking at the above, I can just say one word: "Slacker." I know of one poor devil who keeps his rods in multiple plastic trash cans in the garage. Last time I looked (and this was 5 years ago), he had 11 4wts. 1. Never count your fly rods. Its bad luck like counting your chips in the middle of the poker game. 2. Rod racks are an evil thing. Here's why. I had all may rods perfectly in order ... more in multiple rod racks. They were full. I donated one of my less used rods to my fly fishing club for a raffle. Hmm, crap. Now I had a hole in my rack. Uh, hmm, can't have that. Found a sweet ADG 8' 4wt to fill the hole, but also noticed a 10' 5wt TFO for dapping going cheap. Damn, all my rods are not in their racks. Need a new rack. Put the new dapping rod in there and... crap... look at all those lonely holes in there. And it starts again. Friends don't let friends buy rod racks.
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The main reason that heddon has not been fished in over 6 years is for the exact same reasons why you haven't fished that 8.5' Thramer hollowbuilt and the Dickerson Guide Special. Around here, the only drift boat fishing for trout is on the Lower Sac between Redding and Red Bluff. Other than that it's a steelie show as far as drift boat fishing goes.One of my 9' rods has also not been fished in over ... more 6 years and for the same reasons as the Heddon.. That rod would be a Phillipson Powr Pakt. If I lived in say, SW MT where the wind nearly always blows and drfit boat fishing is the norm, and one can fish with large dries for a good portion of the season, I'd fish both rods more often.
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The danger in reducing the rod collection is that the rod you think you don't like or need today may be seen in a different light down the road. Currently, I'm in the range of, well, exactly 23 rods, spread between bamboo, mostly fiberglass and graphite. I, too, use a spreadsheet to track the ones I have as well as the ones I've sold. Some I regret getting rid of. Like the Claudio I traded for a Kenney. ... more I should've just bought it from Larry and kept the Claudio. Or the Burkheimer/Peak. Or the Orvis 99. Or the Powell 5 pc Companion set; although I did get the Claudio, Burkheimer and a Winston fiberglass plus a Fisher project rod in trade for it. I solved the problem of the Raine 8' 4wt by taking Chris' class and while it isn't hollowbuilt like his commercial rods, it's still darn nice. I'll bet you have more than a few reels that match up with those rods in some sensible fashion. I wouldn't imagine you're fishing an Abel or a Bauer on that Phillipson Peerless. I use key labels, those little round metallic-rimmed paper labels so I can find the rod or reel I'm looking for. But then that may be too much organization. It is more fun just poking through the stack. You might find something fun you forgot about. Jim
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A Linus-powered PC?? Does it need a security blanket? Glad to see you're admitting to hoarding...but what the hell...that's what life is for.....I need another .22 Martini Target rifle...always. I need another wad of fuzz for tying...always. Relax, enjoy your stash....J2
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Clearly, you need to buy the 8.5' Heddon #14 2F I decided is probably surplus to requirements. Still, I know what you mean; one of my favorite 8.5' rods is a just barely postwar impregnated Orvis that is very sweet and lively -- a cut above the heavier-tipped Orvis rods that became the norm soon after.
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My total comes in at 17. Thirteen bamboo rods and 4 graphites. I did thin the herd a few years ago when I sold several of my 9' bamboo rods to help with buying an 8' 3/2 5wt McKenzie Special by Mike Brooks. So it can be done. Besides, the number of 9' bamboo rods I had was getting rather embarrassing and I realized I don't need a half dozen 9' bamboo rods so the number I have now is 3. And they're ... more all 3/2 2F Heddons. On the other hand, I still have a half dozen 8.5' 5wt bamboo rods and do I really need that many? One of them has not been fished since before our oldest child was born (he's 6 now), so maybe that's the one I should sell? Just can't bring myself to do it though. The rod in question is a 3/2 2f Heddon #17 from the Classic Era with the upolcking reel seat. The rod made in 1936 most likely so hard to sell it considering that it was made a few years before WWII began.
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Creeker: Just counted, 18 Underachiever. How do you sleep at night?
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This may seem a bit off topic but perhaps not really. In 2000, wife and I went to Iran on holiday and my Big Thing was to bring three cameras—a Nikon F2, Leica M6 and Mamiya M7. I spent *every* farking minute faffing about cameras (and lenses for three different camera systems) and not actually attending to what we were experiencing and came back with a shed load of pretty indifferent photos (though ... more perhaps much better memories). Moral: simpler is better. The best rod you have is the one you have with you most. But I know you know that. Trout Underground is, as always, a breath of sanity and wonderfulness. All good thoughts J xxx
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Just counted, 18
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Sounds like you need to hang out with Tyler Durden from Fight Club. You know, the whole your stuff ends up owning you thing. Wait- I wonder, how many rods does Brad Pitt own? We are all screwed. At least I only have 16 rods (I think.)
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I think there's a perceived need variable in there somewhere.
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The last time I saw Grog he was hiding in a row of bushes, flinging feces at anyone he thought might be moving in on his water. Frankly, he's my kind of homo erectus.
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Marty: I see room for at least half a dozen rods in your rack just stand ‘em up a bit straighter….. Masking tape and a spreadsheet? How the hell do you plan to deceive yourself about the rod count? As for the picture, that was just one of the two racks. As for Beasley, I've got five, but could probably make room for his version of that Para 15. I don't have to, but I probably could.
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Taku: Dang, Tom. I quickly scrolled to the bottom of the post looking for the long list of rods your were practically GIVING away so you could purchase a quality rod for M1. Needless to say, I was bitterly disappointed to see nary a rod for sale. I actually thought about it, but figured shooting pictures meant another week with no post. I'll give the Undergrounders first crack tho.
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Mark Coleman: Didn’t Einstein prove that outdoor gear is neither created nor destroyed, it just changes hands? Dad would be so proud that 4.5 yrs of engineering school didn’t go to waste. Isn't that R=MC2 (rods=cost*available space [squared])?
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flyfish ks: That sounds like a win win for any rodaholic. With an attitude like that, you're not getting into the group therapy sessions.
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Idaho steel: Shit Tom, how did you get that photo of my living room? The Underground's Intelligence Division is working pretty closely with the NSA these days. (And it turns out our security is better than theirs.)
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My name is Marty and I remain an unrepentant gear whore..... rods and reel cases are marked with a number on some low tack (painters) blue masking tape... this corresponds to a spreadsheet with details the rod tubes are in cardboard blueprint boxes with a number range written on them..... of course being divorced the number of rods is strictly between me and my insurance agent.....it is against the ... more laws of nature to even suggest such a thing as too many rods... too many reels ...or too much good dry fly hackle.....when I'm dead somebody else can figure out what to do with the stuff.... Jim Beasley is getting in his mid 80's now I believe he's an irrascible but loved local guy.... I've got several but the oddball is an 8 ft 8wt parabolic a real cannon that goes musky fishing once a year and once for stripers.... I see room for at least half a dozen rods in your rack just stand 'em up a bit straighter.....
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Dang, Tom. I quickly scrolled to the bottom of the post looking for the long list of rods your were practically GIVING away so you could purchase a quality rod for M1. Needless to say, I was bitterly disappointed to see nary a rod for sale.
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Didn't Einstein prove that outdoor gear is neither created nor destroyed, it just changes hands? Dad would be so proud that 4.5 yrs of engineering school didn't go to waste.
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Shit Tom, how did you get that photo of my living room? At least you cropped out the rest of the crap. The set of nine foot Sawyers propped in the corner always generates such odd comments...
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FlyLink: Feeling your pain with the new gun, want a Blaser REAL bad! Probably have to buy my kid one first, I sort of promised him one when he makes Eagle Scout. Fair ’nuff! One winning lottery ticket would free me from this kind of agonizing decision.
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Steve: My wife has shoes. I have fly rods. It’s perfectly justifiable. Co-enabler.
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Hmm, well selling some rods you don't use that often would be a nice start toward one of those Raine's 8' 4wts. You get a sweet new rod and reduce inventory at the same time. That sounds like a win win for any rodaholic.
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Feeling your pain with the new gun, want a Blaser REAL bad! Probably have to buy my kid one first, I sort of promised him one when he makes Eagle Scout. Fair 'nuff!
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Him say good. Grog.
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My good man, Please allow me to intercede on behalf of my evolutionary-challenged compatriot, Mr. Grog, (affectionately known to his friends as Tiny). As you can see, the poor troglodytic soul struggles in his communications with basic subject-verb agreement and, as an unfortunate result, has confused your superior literary intellect with regards to his generous offer. He has graciously agreed, here, ... more to relieve you of the objects of your stress. He really is a kind and gentle soul, once you get beyond the rock throwing, and I suggest that for your peace of mind (and possibly your ongoing safety) you accept his most generous assistance. And to facilitate this cathartic transfer, feel free to ship the more delicate bamboo pieces through my offices. I'll be sure to see that Mr. Grog receives them unharmed. It's the very least I can do. You're very, very welcome. Mike
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My wife has shoes. I have fly rods. It's perfectly justifiable.
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David: My “rod” problem turned into a business.Now I’m looking for a 12 step process to get me straight.The golden glow of tonkin cane is mesmerizing. You're a goner. Next.
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Mike Sepelak: Grog help. Send rods. Feel better. Thanks. Make sure you send those rods to me insured.
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Craig: My name is Craig and I am a rodaholic.I went on a one-day fishing trip last spring and packed five rods in my car.Someone please tell me why. Craig, it's not your fault. You simply have a disease -- one that's entirely treatable. Simply drink lots of PBR, which will help you learn to enjoy the lesser things in life. Good fly rods will grow less important.
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My "rod" problem turned into a business. Now I'm looking for a 12 step process to get me straight. The golden glow of tonkin cane is mesmerizing.
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Grog help. Send rods. Feel better.
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My name is Craig and I am a rodaholic. I went on a one-day fishing trip last spring and packed five rods in my car. Someone please tell me why.
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