Bury Me With My Phillipson Bamboo Fly Rods Part II

Category:
Fly Fishing, Underground Entertainment
Added Date:
Thursday, 29 Mar, 2007
Summary
Some fly rods exert a powerful hold on those who use them, and when a rod marries itself to your casting stroke, only a fool would put it down in the pursuit of new technology or glossier finish.
 
Content
(Click to read "Bury Me With My Phillipson Bamboo Fly Rods," Part I)

Some fly rods exert a powerful hold on those who use them, and when a rod marries itself to your casting stroke, only a fool would put it down in the pursuit of new technology or glossier finish.

In truth, fly fishers chose their fly rods for many different reasons, and when you stumble across a series of rods that fish well and come neatly packaged with an interesting background, well... let's just say I'm a sucker for that kind of thing.

Bamboo Rods
My first bamboo fly rod (going on 15 years from now) was a revelation, but my first Phillipson was a godsend.

In truth, my first cane rod was smooth, but it wasn't much in the way of an all-around rod.

A unmarked 8' 5wt of indeterminate manufacture, it was fun to fish but lacked the backbone to set the hook on all but the slowest-reacting trout. God forbid I should try to fish a streamer.

The first Phillipson I cast immediately soured me on the previous rod. Almost as smooth and far more powerful, here was a bamboo rod that felt like a fly rod was supposed to feel, yet it fished – to my purposes – as well as any of the graphite rods I owned.


One of my 8' 5wt Phillipsons -- this one an impregnated model.

Long casts? It did the job on the rivers I fished, especially once I let the rod do the work. And short casts? Nothing clothed in carbon came close.

It was an 8' 5wt, I fished it a lot, and when I had the chance to buy an 8.5' 5wt Phillipson, I latched onto it immediately.

Here was a rod with the delicacy to fish #18 BWO dries and high stick dries in pocket water, yet it could cast to any reasonable fishing distance provided the caster wasn't an impatient brute, lacking in refinement and personal hygiene.

With those two Phillipsons firmly in hand, I started digging into the company's past, and what I unearthed pretty much sealed the deal.

The Phillipson Story
Bill Phillipson was a Swedish immigrant who started working for the Denver-based Granger rod company in the 1920s.

By all accounts a natural craftsman, he was also an independent thinker with a knack for solving problems.

When Goodwin Granger died in the early 1930s, Phillipson quickly ascended to Operations Manager. It was then he began the series of battles with the company's office manager that helped define his legend in the rod building industry.

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Victory"
Early in his tenure at Granger, Phillipson butted heads with the office manager, a woman whose name I have written down but can't recall. Both wanted control over the rod operation.

Eventually, the infighting grew so fierce that Goodwin Granger's window had to step in and settle it. She awarded Phillipson control, and rumor has it he issued the "Victory" model Granger fly rod in celebration.

Michael Sinclair – a bamboo rod historian and fan of Bill Phillipson – said no one could positively confirm the story, but that those close to Phillipson thought it had the ring of truth.

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51"
The Granger operation was shut down for WWII. After the war ended, the widow Granger wanted to sell the company rather than reopen it.

Both Bill Phillipson and the Wright-McGill company were in competition to buy the company, with Bill Phillipson offering less cash but a richer percentage of future sales.

The office manager was reported to have said that if Phillipson got the company, it wouldn't exist five years hence.

Eventually, the company went to Wright-McGill (I've also heard this statement attributed to the Widow Granger, but Sinclair said manager, and I trust him), and Phillipson started The Phillipson Rod Company, which quickly grew into a success.

Never forgetting the slight, Phillipson later marked all his 1951 rods with a "51" to commemorate his company's fifth year in operation. Zing!

Frankly, you can't buy style like that. You're born with it.

And if you happen to have a Phillipson with the "51" on it (as I do – a 9' Pacemaker), you can't help but look at it and chuckle.

Sell it? Don't even ask.

A Populist Rod?
Phillipson's rods are often maligned for their nylon thread wraps, purple glue lines and ingenious plastic or metal reel seats, but it's important to note that Phillipson never wanted to build works of art.

He built fishing rods, and while their less-refined appearance has kept Phillipson prices within reason (the collectors of the short, ultra-refined eastern-style rods simply paid Phillipsons no mind), they have been "discovered" as of late.

Used Phillipson rods don't yet approach the prices of the Grangers -- most of which were also built under Bill Phillipson's direction -- but prices have been rising.

This is in contrast with Phillipson's ability to keep his rods priced low, a result of refined manufacturing techniques. The best value in the line was probably the Pacemaker, which carried a $25 price tag during the late 40s and early 50s, though even his highest-quality rod (the tapers were identical, only the quality of the cane and fittings changed) only cost $75.

I've seen estimates suggesting Phillipson's bamboo rod production never rose above 8,000-10,000 rods per year until he started selling some of the premier fiberglass rods of the era, when production rose to the 25,000-30,000 range.


One of the later Phillipson catalog covers, and a picture of Bill himself.

While some found the wraps on his bamboo rods a bit on the gaudy side, I like them.

Others have downplayed the cosmetics of his bakelite and "no rock" metal reel seats -- which don't suggest the "polished by virgins until glossy" refinement of far more expensive rods -- but unlike some of those rods, I've never had a reel abruptly vacate a Phillipson reel seat.

And his purple glue lines? They exist because the purple glue was simply the best available at the time. Strong and waterproof, the glue allowed Phillipson to impregnate some of his rods with a resin after they'd been glued up (instead of before).

This developed a waterproof seal on the rod, but kept the resin from soaking into the pithy center portion of the rod. As a result, Phillipson's impregnated rods gained less weight than the Orvis models and fished better as a result.

Phillipson's Legacy: His Rods
It's important to note that Phillipson wasn't simply a machinist with a penchant for making fly rods; he was an expert caster and fisherman.

He set a world fly casting distance record (140 feet, 1934, Altamont CO), and was often seen prowling the banks of the South Platte river until a few years before Alzheimers claimed him in 1987 at the age of 83.

Befitting a Western fly fisher, Phillipson's best rods were probably his 8', 8.5' and 9' models, but in Part III, I'll write more about the rods Bill Phillipson left behind, including his fiberglass models.

Until then, see you at the "5" rod rack, Tom Chandler.


A 1949 magazine ad.



(Click to read "Bury Me With My Phillipson Bamboo Fly Rods," Part III)

(Click to read "Bury Me With My Phillipson Bamboo Fly Rods," Part I)

bamboo, bamboo fly rods, fiberglass fly rods, phillipson, phillipson bamboo fly rods, phillipson fly rods, fly fishing, fly rod
 
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Destinations
 (1)
Nestled in the north end of the Sacramento Valley, Shasta County and its three Cities - Redding, Anderson, and Shasta Lake - are 545 miles north of Los Angeles; 162 miles north of ... moreSacramento; 433 miles south of Portland, Oregon; and 592 miles south of Seattle, Washington.

In 2004, as an effort to increase tourism in the area, the Sundial Bridge, designed by world-renowned architectural designer Santiago Calatrava, was completed. The Sundial Bridge casts its gnomon shadow upon a dial to the north of the bridge accurately once a year during the Summer Solstice. With the objective of providing pedestrian access to the north and south of Turtle Bay Exploration Park, the Sundial Bridge has not only lived up to its purpose but has also become an icon for the City of Redding in the present day.

Redding is one of the best places to launch for Trophy Rainbow Trout & Trophy Steelhead Fishing in Northern California. A number of great rivers are within an easy drive and local guides can on any given day help you figure out where the fishing is great.

The Klamath river, Sacaramento river, Trinity River and the Feather river are all being frequented by local guides and fly fisher.
Fishing Waters
Nestled in rocky basin along side steep canyon walls, this 40-mile Feather River tributary is known for its great beauty and abundant trout. By car, it a short drive from Sacramento. ... moreThe Yuba River continues through the canyons until it flattens around Parks Bar Bridge then runs parallel to highway.

//

Species include wild rainbow trout, steelhead in the fall, and striped bass. While rainbows tend to average about 12 inches, there are recent reports of 18-25 inch trout being found.
Game Fish Opportunities:
Guide Reports:
The Sacramento River is the principal river of Northern California in the United States, and is the largest river in California. Rising in the Klamath Mountains, near Mount Shasta ... more(in Siskiyou county), the river flows south for 445 miles, through the northern section (Sacramento Valley) of the Central Valley, before reaching the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay. It forms a common delta with the San Joaquin River before entering Suisun Bay, the northern arm of San Francisco Bay. The river drains about 27,500 square miles, with an average annual runoff of 22 million acre-feet, in 19 California counties, mostly within a region bounded by the Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada known as the Sacramento Valley, but also extending as far as the volcanic plateaus of Northeastern California.

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The McCloud River and its tributaries offer excellent fishing opportunities. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife regularly stocks the Upper McCloud River at Lower Falls ... morewith Rainbow trout. Anglers also occasionally catch German brown trout from earlier stockings or those that traveled up from the McCloud Reservoir, and Brook trout. Remember that the Bull Trout or Dolly Varden is an endangered species and should be released if caught.

//

The Lower McCloud River, from McCloud Reservoir to Shasta Lake, has been designated a Wild Trout Stream by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. This portion of the river is not artificially stocked and has special fishing regulations. Only artificial flies and lures with barbless hooks can be used. At the McCloud River Preserve, located one mile below Ah-Di- Na Campground, fishing is limited to catch and release only. Consult the map on the back, and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife Regulations for further details and restrictions.

Endangered species - The McCloud River is the only fishery in California which supports the now rare Bull Trout, also known as the Dolly Varden Trout. Actually a member of the Char family, it is found between Lower Falls and Shasta Lake. Because it is considered an endangered species by the State of California, it must be released if caught.
Game Fish Opportunities:
Trips
$
325
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$
450
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
4 hours - 8 hours
Fishing Waters:
Destination:
The Yuba River is one of the most popular known fly fishing rivers in Northern California, and that is why it’s one of the most sought after rivers for fly fishing enthusiasts. This ... moreriver is one that can yield 20 fish one day and leave you scratching your head the next, that's why having a knowledgeable Yuba River Fly Fishing Guide is so important. The abundance of aquatic insects on this river is why it is so sought after, it's one of the few rivers in California that you can effectively fish dries year round. While the river plays host to a number of species, including steelhead and king salmon at times, the resident wild rainbows are the most sought after species throughout the year. They can be picky at times, but once you get in tune with their feeding habits you're bound to have a blast. The fishing on the Yuba is top-notch and I haven't found a river yet that is this much fun to fish. This river produces year-round spunky wild rainbow trout that can reach over 20".

Pound for pound the Yuba River trout is a species of its own. They are the toughest, hardest fighting trout you will ever hook into. If you've never had an 16" fish take you into your backing within seconds, then it’s time that you fish the Yuba River. In the fall, it is also home to a native/wild King Salmon run with some pushing 50lbs and big enough to devour any Yuba trout in its path. Nonetheless, it's the Yuba's steelhead that really puts the icing on the cake. Though not huge like the American river winter run steelhead (Yuba River steelhead range from 2-6 lbs), these half-pint steelhead are among the hardest fighting and the most beautiful fish you will ever have the pleasure of encountering. The Yuba gets a shot of them midsummer, then again from November to April. Not only is there year round fishing, but there is also an abundance of bug life as well ranging from BWO's, PMD's, Midges, Caddis, Skwalas, Golden Stones, March Browns, Hoppers and every so often a Salmon Fly, that will have these fish feeding no matter the time of year. There is even an egg bite on t he Yuba too, this happens during the salmon spawn in October, also during this time of year there is something special that happens on the river that I will show you too. Something you never thought possible and it will be our little secret. Even after all that the Yuba does, however, have something else to offer. As an added bonus from the fishing, there are a lot of wild critters roaming its banks as well, big bucks, strutting toms, beavers, otters, ducks, geese and even black bears. All that and great fishing, what more could you ask for.

-Brian
$
325
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$
450
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
4 hours - 8 hours
If you have ever driven over the Lower Sacramento River or even fished it, you know that due to its shear size and abundance of water, this makes it extremely intimidating. That's ... morewhy having a knowledgable Lower Sacramento River Fly Fishing Guide is so important. A great guide will not only put you on the fish, but will also show you the fishy spots accessable by land, the put ins and pull outs for boats, as well as the bug life, the flies to use and when you go on your own, how to put all that t ogether to be successful. The Lower Sacramento River is a big tailwater fishery and California's biggest trout river, and its rainbows are just as big and powerful as the river they live in. If you want big fish and year-round fishing, this is the river for you. With more food than your local all you can eat buffets (2,500 insects per square foot of river), the average fish grows to a healthy and hard-fighting 16-18", and pigs pushing two feet are not out of the question, so bring some big guns. The fishing season is year-round, and water temperatures remain fairly constant too, as the river comes out of the bottom of Shasta Lake.

This river consists of long, indescribable, spring creek like stretches that are broken up by islands, deep pools, long riffles, gravel bars and undulating shelf’s, many of which are more pronounced during lower flows.

If having one of the best trout fisheries in the state isn’t enough, the Lower Sac also hosts some great runs of Steelhead and Chinook salmon too. It also hosts a variety of other fish, such as, shad, squawfish, stripers, largemouth and smallmouth bass, these populations of fish become higher the farther you get away from Shasta Lake. The highest flows are during the summer months, when snow melt is at its greatest, so a drift boat is highly recommended.

You can walk and wade during the higher flows if you so desire, but staying near the bank will be your safest bet. The best time to walk and wade the Lower Sac is going to be during fall, winter and early spring, there is very little snow melt, and the rain that falls goes to filling up the lake, so the river is low and great for walk and wading. This is the time to get out there and really learn the river's bottom and fish those slots that only come out in lower flows, either way “PLEASE WADE WITH CAUTION”. But due to the river’s size and the amount of private property along its banks, those that prefer to wade have two options. One is to fish from public parks and access points along the 16 miles or river between Redding and Anderson, or, from your boat, getting out at the riffles and fishy slots to make some casts.

Public access is fairly easy though on the Lower Sac, there are 6 boat launches, and many public parks and access points along the river that flows almost parallel with interstate 5.

-Brian
$
500
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
1 day
Fishing Waters:
Destination:
Outfitters
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We are a team of friendly and knowledgeable fly fishing guides, with a combined 40 years of fly fishing experience, dedicated to making your adventure on the water with us as enjoyable ... moreand informative as possible. We want you to succeed in all of your fishy endeavors, and we will take the time with you to make sure that you have all the techniques and skills necessary to catch fish wherever you go. Float or Walk and wade with us on one of Northern California's finest rivers and streams and we will accommodate our guiding style to meet your needs and abilities. With our extensive fly fishing knowledge and experience on waters all over Northern California, we will guide you on a fly fishing trip you will not soon forget.

NCFG practices catch and release on all boats. We respect the sport of fishing and wish to give all anglers the opportunity to experience the gratification we strive to give each of our clients.
42 comments
I have a phillipson like your talking about in excellent condition I'd sell for $550.00 if you know any one that would like to have it
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Hi. I have my Dad's Phillips Peacemaker 49 8 1/2-5 HDH and I'm wanting to sell it. It has one tip, original slotted cloth cover and aluminum transport tube. Ferrules are all tight, eyes, treads, everything is orginal and in excellent condition. Has been well kept and not used for I know personally for at least 50 years but unfortunately find myself needing to sell. From what I'm finding, I feel asking ... more $450. is more than fair. This is my first attempt to sell anything using internet. Will furnish whatever is needed. Cell 210-771-7914 Ask for James or leave message.
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Agnes Marshall was the Office Manager @ Granger w/whom Bill Phillipson had that rather unique relationship. She's the inspiration for his marking "51" on his 1951 rods. Great article!
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Hi Tom, Those price ranges (600-900) would be right about where I would guess too in today's market for an 8' Phillipson in good condition. I also agree it wouldn't last long at $475. Maybe even minutes :)
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Keith; Whew! At first reading I thought you were suggesting someone sold one of those for $2,000, and I was getting ready to throw a flag on you for it. On second reading, $475 feels better, but probably a bit low if the rod really is in good shape. On dealer lists I occasionally see good 8' Phillipsons in the $600-$900 range (though I never see a lot of them). I think it's less likely a private seller ... more -- who lacked a reputation -- could necessarily get the top of that range. I will say this: if someone was willing to sell an 8' Phillipson in good, fishable shape for $475, I bet they could sell it in a couple hours...
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Oh, an HEH could fish a modern 5 wt line. Nice for a bamboo rod that length. Overall a rod many would drool over.
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I have a price listing from around 2000 for an 8' 4-1/4 oz. 3 pc (2 tip) Pacemaker. At that time in good condition a rod could have a value of approx. 475. We've had some slowing of the economy, but rods of this length and make are only getting less common, so I'm thinking at least that price but probably more. If you list with original rod tube, sock, tips of similar length, good varnish etc. values ... more are better than a rod with less. Listed on Ebay I've seen rods like this in good condition do surprisingly well.
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trump#32;bound: I have a phillipson 51 pacemaker 4.25 8? heh four piece rod in good condition was wondering the value of the rod and how easy would it be to sell I'm tempted to go the "it's worthless and probably even toxic based on the glue used, but in a fit of good will, send it to me and I'll dispose of it at no cost to you" route. But I won't. The 8' Phillipsons are quite nice and -- if they ... more really are in very good condition (no broken bits, ferrules good, not used every day for three decades, etc) they're worth a fair amount -- probably about as much (or even a little more) as a top-end graphite fly rod from one of the top names in the biz. That's assuming original sock and tube, original tips, the varnish isn't toast, etc. I'm always hesitant to offer prices, especially to people who aren't knowledgeable about bamboo fly rods; inevitably the thing turns out to be the victim of dry rot, a half-dozen terrible repairs, and the two original tips were replaced by a pair from a 9' horror rod. All that said, an 8' Phillipson in truly good condition would not be a difficult sell.
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I have a phillipson 51 pacemaker 4.25 8' heh four piece rod in good condition was wondering the value of the rod and how easy would it be to sell
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hi can anyone tell me about lars lonn fly rods he was from ornskoldsvik sweden
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IT IS A BAMBOO,I TOOK PICTURES AND CAN'T FIGURE HOW TO LOAD THEM INTO THIS REPLY BOX. IF YOU KNOW HOW I WILL SEND PICTURES. THANKS ,TOM
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I agree; it's very possible the ferrules on the rod had to be re-set, and lacking the same color thread (the thread on the wraps will fade over time and become impossible to match), it's quite likely they used whatever was closest. Also, is this a bamboo rod? I don't recall a "Custom" model in cane.
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Tom, when you say custom made, was this made by a cane rod maker using a Phillipson taper? Usually a maker will use the same thread color for the butt, mid, and tip sections. If the rod is refinished from an original Phillipson, the person refinishing may try to match the original silk or nylon thread, depending on what was used. If the tips threads are lighter in color, perhaps they did not have ... more an exact match. Sometimes a production rod has a usable butt and mid section (if it has a mid) and broken tip sections. I have a WM Granger like this, so am making a new tip. In this case I am refinishing the entire rod and using matching thread. It could also be that your rod had a usable butt section, but the tips were added later, or possibly some guides fell off and the restorer re-wrapped the guides with a thread of different color. If the cane 'color' of the two sections differs, the ferrules look different, or the node spacing differs, that could be another clue. Whatever the case it is uncommon to have threads of different color from the butt to tip section, so I would say it is a repair of some nature. Hope this helps.
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I HAVE A PHILLIPSON #957 CUSTOM MADE VERY NICE , BUT BOTH END SECTIONS HAVE MUCH LIGHTER COLOR THREAD. IS THIS COMMON OR A REPAIR?
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You sure it's bamboo? Inscription makes me think it's one of the early model fiberglass rods. If it's round, it's fiberglass. If it's hex-shaped, it's bamboo. The "HDH" designation means you'll want to start with a 6wt and see how that feels. Based on my experience with other rods, it could go up or down a line size based on your casting style. One thing to keep in mind; odds are a 50s-era fly rod ... more from almost any manufacturer will start suffering problems with the ferrule cement. Don't be surprised if you feel a "knocking" sensation when you cast the rod - it could easily be the ferrules coming loose on the rod. Get that fixed before you cast it any more.
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I recently purchased a Phillipson bamboo fly rod at an auction. It is a 7.5' rod with the following letters and numbers. S76 HDH 3 3/4 OZ. Can you tell me more about this rod, like what type of fishing it is best suited for, what line weight is suggested and what it might be valued at? It is used, but in good shape.
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What is the conversion for rod weight in ounces to fly line weight? I see Phillipson rods advertised in ounces but don't understand the conversion. I am seeking a 5wt 8-1/2 foot rod.nbsp;nbsp;(Quote) I have this rod but my number is #18 what is the value?
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I refinished a 3 pc 2 tip 8.5 Phillipson Pacemaker. I have to admit that it does not have original thread wrap colors, and I chose to use red silk with no color preserver and it is translucent. I replaced the stripping guide with a NS agate guide and the original bakelite reel seat with a NS Struble downlocking seat with wooden spacer. Sorry, just liked the look. I use the rod mostly with a WF 6wt ... more line for smallmouth bass. It has plenty of backbone and casts a line nicely.
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I just acquired a pristine shape Philipson Pacemaker #29 7-4-3/4, 2 piece, 2 tips. I assume the 7-4-3/4 means the length, but it measures 7" even. Both tip sections are identical and measure the same. I don't see any mentioning of 7 footers anywhere for this model. Anything you can tell me about it?
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Sounds like one of the Johnson era spinning rods (Johnson bought and owned the Phillipson Rod Company for a couple years). I'm afraid I don't know much about that era.
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Hi there, great stuff you have about the Phillipson Rods! My boss at work recently gave me her Father's old fishing rod and I'm trying to find out more about it and how much it's worth. On the rod it says The Johnson "Profile" Eponite Series "400" crafted my Phillipson (with globe logo that says worlds finest) then under it says 4S701M Lures to 1/2oz. Made in USA. I've looked everywhere and can't ... more find any information on it. Thanks!
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I have a Phillipson Pacemaker that needs some TLC... It does not have any other markings on it other than the name. It is an 8' three piece with an additional tip that is 4" longer , missing the line guide tip and somewhat split. The butt and second rod section have missing line guides, however, I have them. The reel seat and cork handle are intact but show wear. Anyone out there that can point me ... more in the direction of a reputable person who can "restore" it to its near original condition?... a price range of what it might cost for a restoration?.. and finally whether or not the cost of restoration might exceed the fair market value of the rod? Thanks, in advance, for your response(s)...
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@BBill: Thanks for stepping in. @Mark: Bill's numbers are right. The heavier rod is usually labeled "The Dry Fly Special" - a rod I'd characterize as having a much steeper taper than the "regular" Phillipson 8.5' rod (which is a 5wt to most folks). I've owned a couple Dry Fly Specials and admire their efficiency, though perhaps not their casting feel. I think they feel a little woody, though not everyone ... more agrees. I will say a windy day is a good day to be holding a Dry Fly Special.
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Mark, I gleamed the infomation that you requested from the book TROUT Tackle one by Ernest Schwiebert page 87 8 1/2 ft 4 1/4 oz DT5F HDH 8 1/2ft 4 1/2 oz DT6F HCH I hope this helps. Bamboo Bill
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What is the conversion for rod weight in ounces to fly line weight? I see Phillipson rods advertised in ounces but don't understand the conversion. I am seeking a 5wt 8-1/2 foot rod.
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The #29 doesn't really mean anything (most believe it's an inspector or production number). What do you want to know? Can't tell you much without more information.
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I have a pacemaker #29 any info on that?
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Mike: A Dragon? Does that by any chance really read "Paragon?" The Paragon was the cheapest of the Phillipsons, yet it was still a very fishable rod. I'm afraid I haven't kept up with bamboo rod value these days - if it's truly in excellent condition, then perhaps $350-$500?
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I have a Phillipson 3pc, 8 1/2 Dragon slightly used in excellent condition with 2 tips I inherited from my father. Could you please tell me what it may be worth.
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I have no connection with Ricks Rods however, if your indoubt about the rod I would send it to Rick and get his opinon. He has or did have a very extensive selection of threads that Phillipson used on his rods. I have cast a fair number of the rods in question...indeed good fishing rods.
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I don't have any idea who's building those rods for that company, which also sells canoes, wool clothes, etc. Could be a reputable builder, but nothing rules out the possibility this is a Chinese-made rod you could buy at 1/3 the price. $1900 is a lot for an impregnated bamboo rod -- that puts you into the range of all but the most expensive builders -- so be damned sure they're handing you a very, ... more very good rod and not lot of marketing hype.
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Tom - Hopefully this isn't too off topic, but I'm in the market for my first bamboo rod. I have a contact at this company and was wondering if you have ever heard anything about their rods? http://www.justincharles.com/split-bamboo-fly-rod.aspx Thanks in advanced!
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Sure. If it hasn't been stored correctly there are some potential problems -- cracked varnish, loose ferrules, even dry rot -- but the rod will likely fish just fine. If you can find a local bamboo rod builder, you could have them check it out, but otherwise, I'd say fish the thing. That's what Bill Phillipson built 'em to do.
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I have a Paragon rod that my father passed along to me that he bought back in 1947 and has not fished with for about 20 years, is it ok to fish with? Thank you..
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Gary: The number on the Phillipson most likely ID's the inspector (most common thought) or (less likely) the wrapper. For a tip, Google "AJ Thramer." He builds a sort of "generic" tip section for Grangers and Phillipsons. Good luck!
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Tom- I've injoyed the story and the great information on the Phillipson. I came upon a Phillipson Pacemaker with the number 58 on it. Can you tell me what that means? It's missing the tip section also. Any good sources you can turn me on to ? I am hoping to experience this rod I've read so much about. The website isn't finished yet, but check it out! Thank's Gary
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[...] Click to read Part II of #8220;Bury Me With My Phillipsons.#8221; [...]
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Nice story very nice indeeed. Never cast a Phillipson that I did not like.
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excellent read. I'm also eagerly anticipating pt III.
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Good Morning TC and All, Now I can't wait for #3, as alway Tom and outstanding story, and am heading out to the Tying room to see if ether of mine have a 5 on them. See you on the river. David
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Enjoyed part 2! I think I'll have to head out to the Deschutes tomorrow with a couple of my Phillipson fishing machines! Bruce
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Tom, I never believed that hype "polished by virgins until glossy". Most of the Eastern rodmakers were in NY; where did they find the virgins? Here is a Granger ad from 1939: http://www.overmywaders.com/images/large/Granger39Famp;S.jpg note the prices - $8.50- $75 Here is a Wamp;M ad from 1949: http://www.overmywaders.com/images/large/Wamp;M49Famp;S.jpg note the prices - $20.00 - $100.00 And finally,here ... more is a Phillipson ad from 1949: http://www.overmywaders.com/images/large/Phillipson49Famp;S.jpg note the prices - $19.75 - $75.00 as you said, Phillipson kept his top-end prices down. ($25.00 bought a lot in 1949; it equals $202.28 2006 dollars) Warmest regards, overmywaders
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