2 Rivers Fly FIshing Package All inclusive 2 Days of Fishing and 3 Nights Lodging

 (2)
$
1,710
-
$
2,450
/ Angler
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
2 days
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Erwin C
Our 2 day and 3 night fly fishing packages include comfortable accommodations at our Montana fishing lodge, three home-cooked meals each day, and all ranch activities. They also includes  private access to the Ruby River and a guide. Guided day fishing trips include a Montana fly fishing guide, lunch, and refreshments.

On occasion, water levels may require that we alter the rivers fished. To maintain a high level of personal service, we limit our guests to 10 per week. Please contact our Montana fly fishing guides if you need a custom package or wish to arrange special rates for your fly shop or club.

Notes
  • Montana accommodation tax is included.
  • Fishing licenses are not included.
  • Children are welcome.
 
Highlights
  • 3 nights lodging
  • Guided fly fishing day on the Ruby River
  • Guided fly fishing day on your choice of the Madison River or Beaverhead River.
  • Three home cooked meals per day
What is Included:
Lodging
Breakfast
Dinner
Lunch
Drinks & Snacks
Flies
Tackle
Rates
Per
Capacity
Dates
Duration
Price
Angler
1 - 1
 anglers
Daily2 days
$
1,710
Angler
2 - 2
 anglers
Daily2 days
$
2,450
Fishing Waters
 (2)
Ruby is the perfect name for this river, for it is a largely hidden, sparkling gem. Its crystal clear waters begin in the pristine Beaverhead National Forest in southwest Madison County, ... morebetween the Snowcrest Mountains and the Gravelly range. While it starts as a rather thin trickle, it picks up more than a dozen mountain, freestone creeks, and gains velocity as it flows for 40 miles past Alder and into the Ruby Reservoir. Past Alder, the river runs north between the beautiful Tobacco Root Mountains to the northeast and the Ruby Range to the southwest. Nestled in the quaint Ruby Valley, the river is conveniently located a mere thirty minutes from Ennis and a lovely one-hour drive from Bozeman. Like many other rivers in this region, the Ruby is small at only 76 miles in length, but it is full of surprisingly large fish.

Leaving Alder, the Ruby exits the reservoir as a tailwater and supports abundant midge, caddis, and Pale Morning Dun (PMD) hatches. For a short time the river passes through a scenic, arid canyon before abruptly transitioning into a meandering open agricultural valley. At this point the Ruby runs over vast swaths of private land, sometimes making access difficult. The 40 mile descent from Alder to Twin Bridges also crosses over high-end ranch properties, where again, access can be challenging although public access points do exist and can be easily located.

The river is open year round to fishing and conditions are good through all seasons. Springtime on the Ruby brings hatches of baetis and early season caddis. When the water warms in summer, the river will explode with Yellow Sallies and Pale Morning Duns (PMDs), along with hoppers and other terrestrials. Late summer and early fall is considered by many to be the best time to fish, as clouds settle in the high mountain valley providing fast paced action for the streamer enthusiast. Running a nymph rig subsurface, or using a dry/dropper combo is the best technique on the Ruby throughout the year.

Fish will jump for hoppers during the late summer months, while streamer-fishing can very satisfying throughout the summer and early fall. A predominantly brown trout fishery, the Ruby is full of trophies that often reach 18 – 20 inches. The greatest numbers of rainbow trout are found in the first few miles of the river just below the dam. If you seek a unique opportunity, the upper portions of the Ruby rumored to hold rare cutthroat trout and arctic grayling.
 (4)
The Beaverhead is a nearly 70 mile long tributary of the Jefferson River. Its original course has changed due to the construction of the Clark Canyon Dam, as have its headwaters, once ... moreformed by the confluence of the Red Rock River and Horse Prairie Creek. These rivers, along with the first 6 miles of the Beaverhead, are now flooded as a result of the reservoir project. Today, the Beaverhead flows through a wide valley where it meets the Big Hole River and forms the Jefferson River. The river is well known for its clear, blue-green color, narrow, winding turns, willow-lined, undercut banks and thriving insect life that attracts fish.

The origin of its colorful name can be traced back to the Lewis and Clark Expedition, when their indigenous guide, Sacajawea, recognized a large rock formation in the middle of the river known to her as the Beaver’s Head. According to Lewis, this indicated to her that they were close to the summer retreat of her Indian nation. On August 15, 1805 the party reached her tribe, where one of her remaining brothers, Cameahwait, Chief of the Shoshone, provided crude maps, food and horses, making it possible to continue the Expedition through the mountains. On their return trip Lewis gave the river, once full of beavers, the name it now holds.

Fortunately, floating the Beaverhead in today’s world is much easier, more fun and amply rewarding. It is widely considered one of Montana's premier Brown trout fishing rivers, producing more large trout, particularly Brown trout, than any other river in the state. Due to its abundance of large trout, fly fishing the stretch near Dillon, from Clark Canyon Dam to Barrett’s Dam and through to Twin Bridges, tends to be very popular and get can crowded, even although the fish can also be hard to catch. While large fish can be caught with dry flies, it is primarily a nymph fishing river along with a swiftly moving current, so expect to be constantly mending your line.
 (4)
If fly wranglers were gossips, the “Blue Ribbon” Madison River would likely be their primary object of attention. Arguably it’s the most talked over, written up and frequented river ... morein the entire state of Montana – and that’s saying something. What’s more, no one has anything bad to say about it and that’s for a good reason. There’s nothing bad to say. Its scenic journey begins in Yellowstone National Park at the convergence of the Gibbon and Firehole rivers and continues for 19 miles through parkland. Within the Park, fishing rules apply: no live bait and sorry to disappoint, but it’s catch and release only. Once outside the Park the river meanders past working ranches, stately conifer forests and cottonwood lined banks, interrupted by riffles and quiet runs that contain large rainbow and trophy brown trout. Flowing alongside Yellowstone’s West entrance road, the river enters the Hebgen Lake, created by Hebgen dam, until it reaches Quake Lake, a bit downstream from the dam. At this point the river is commonly called either the Upper Madison or the Lower Madison, although in fact, they are one and the same.

Upper Madison – Quake Lake to Ennis Lake
Directly below Quake Lake the river roars into 5 long miles of Class V whitewater with steep gradients and large boulders along the way. As the rapids decline, the magic begins. For the next 53 miles, often referred to as the 50 Mile Riffle, the cold river runs north and the fish jump high. Annual runs of spawning trout make their way from Hebgen Lake, rainbows in the spring and browns in the fall. Known the world over for its “hard fighting” trout, it’s not unusual to pull a 25” brown from these upper waters. In deference to the purists and fly-fishing enthusiasts, it’s wading only from Quake Lake to Lyons Bridge. Boats may be used to access the river, but if you’re going to fish, your feet must be on the riverbed. Fortunately, the Hegman releases water throughout the year, leveling its flows and relieving it of spring runoff issues and summer shrinkage.

//
Lower Madison – Ennis Lakes to Three Forks
A short section of the river between Ennis Dam and the power station maintain relatively low water levels and provide wonderful opportunities for wading. Past the power station the river regains its muscle and for 7 miles winds through Bear Trap Canyon. Hiking trails offer the only entry, great for those that like to walk and seek the solitude of a designated wilderness area. Floating is permitted but requires a lengthy shuttle and the ability to work through Class III-IV whitewater. Once out of the canyon the river flows in shallow riffles until it reaches Three Forks and joins the Missouri. From Warm Springs to Greycliff, the river is easily accessible for drifters and wading.
Destination
 (2)
This is a small town with a big heart, a veritable fisherman’s paradise. Located near the fish-filled Madison River, and surrounded by the waters of Ennis Lake, the Ruby River, Hebgen ... moreLake, Quake Lake, Henry’s Lake, the Big Hole River and scores of smaller streams, the town boasts what many consider the best trout fishing in the world. As well known for its wranglers as its anglers, Ennis has succeeded in maintaining the look and feel of its original, gold town roots. Warm and hospitable, the area offers a wide variety of accommodations ranging from simple campsites, rustic motels and gracious hotels, to full-service, luxury resorts. Fly shops are numerous, stocked by local experts ready to advise and assist, while guides can be booked for trips throughout the area.

Boredom is the only thing unavailable in Ennis. Throughout the summer season the city hosts a series of events, including its renowned 4th of July Celebration Parade and a genuine, old-fashioned rodeo. In August, fly-fishing luminaries from around the US, flock to Montana to compete in the Madison Fly Fishing Festival. Athletes also find their way to Ennis to compete in the city’s Madison Trifecta, two shorter races followed by a full Marathon at 9000 feet, the highest elevation run in America. For the true sportsman, October falls in with the annual Hunter’s Feed. What’s caught, typically elk, moose deer, pheasant and bobcat, gets cooked on the streets and served up to hungry spectators.

Flanked by three grand mountain ranges, The Tobacco Root, Gravelly and Madison, Ennis is scenic and entertaining – truly an authentic, fly fisher’s haven.
Outfitter
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We have become very versatile as outfitters to make the most of the natural beauty and amenities available in the Ruby Valley. We offer guided and unguided Montana fly fishing all ... moreseason long on four of the state's best fishing rivers. We function as a dude ranch in summer offering horseback trail rides and Montana pack trips into the Beaverhead National Forest. In autumn, we offer guided and unguided bow or rifle hunting for elk, deer, antelope, moose, bear, and upland game birds.

Broken Arrow Lodge is as versatile as we are. This is your home-away-from-home whether you are a fly fisherman, hunter, or horseback rider. Some of our guests only stay at our Montana lodge at arrival and departure since they want to spend most of their time in the backcountry. Others prefer to stay at the lodge and enjoy the comforts of home. Either way, you can get to your final destination by foot, horse, or 4-wheel drive.

Our Montana fishing guides are passionate about Montana fly fishing and your success. We are in close proximity to five famous Montana fly fishing streams including the prestigious Ruby River which runs right through our property. We cater both to experienced anglers that want to know the best spots and new anglers that need instruction. We offer both guided and unguided fly fishing packages for you to choose from. Come alone, with a buddy, or bring the whole family! We also have many other activities besides fly fishing to round out your vacation.
Guides:
Fishing Reports
Jeff looks great nice and clear, but lots of free floating miss. Which is a huge pain in the neck especially when your trying to strip streamers There are a few hoppers and the midnight ... morestones are starting to show up. Which makes dries an attractive alternative. When you can get them to eat em. Recent cool weather (snow in the mountains) has dropped water temps from low 70s to low 60s jump starting the fish at least until it warms up again.
Fishing Water Report:
Date:
Wednesday, 13 Jul, 2016
Fish Caught:
13-19 fish
Payment
Cancellation Policy
Standard
  • Cancellations made 14 days before will be fully refunded.
  • Cancellations made 7 days before will be refunded 50% of the amount paid.
  • Cancellations made at a later date will not be refunded.
Payment
2 reviews   0 comments
Communication
(5.0 of 5)
Scheduling
(5.0 of 5)
Advice
(5.0 of 5)
Boat Comfort
(5.0 of 5)
Outfitter Review
A Reluctant Cowgirl Gets Tough
I did not grow up with horses—or even a goldfish, for that matter, and I am a city girl whose idea of a perilous adventure has long been driving from Philadelphia to Washington, DC, as a child to visit an aunt and an uncle in a car which also held another relative smoking a noxious cigar. And yet, this year I’ll be going back for my ninth straight cowgirl vacation at the Broken Arrow Lodge and absolutely ... more looking forward to riding a mule for hours in a National Forest where peeing in the woods is inescapable. Of course, there is a certain incentive for repeat trips in a Lodge program that rewards such things with discounts, but I suspect that my husband and I would make our annual pilgrimage even if the owners, Sherry and Erwin Clark, had raised their prices each year—which they haven’t. In fact, they’ve barely raised their fees at all during our years of patronage, and six nights of spotless, comfortable lodging, wonderful, plentiful food, and unlimited horseback riding remains a bargain there. But, to be absolutely honest, what makes the Broken Arrow’s hospitality enticing at any cost is the friendship that seems to develop between the crew and the guests during a first or only visit and the sense of safety and care that has turned a tenderfoot like me into a comfortable, once-a-year rider in Montana’s gorgeous wilderness.I was a bit frightened to ride in the high, rough country before our first visit years ago, but within the three days of that first vacation, the Clarks’ complete-but-never-overwhelming instructions quickly gave me the confidence to go out each day and to decide at the trip’s end that I’d be back again the next summer. Naturally, my inexperience creeps up on me between weeks in Montana, but it’s soon dispelled by the beauty of the Beaverhead National Forest and another edition of the Lodge’s gentle introduction to mountain riding. This is helped no little bit by the superb training of the Broken Arrow’s string of horses and mules—I prefer a mule because I fancy mules share my extreme need to WATCH WHERE WE’RE GOING—and the Clarks’ kind of education. With inexperienced riders like me (or even with riders who have ridden before but not recently), they offer an incremental diet of quiet instruction that’s delivered in small, digestible, frequently repeated doses that never overwhelm a student with too much, too soon. We’re given enough to get us going safely, and then that knowledge is added to whenever a situation demands something new and/or different. That way, the experienced riders aren’t forced to listen to things that are already second nature to them, and people like me are saved from having to acknowledge either their trepidation or their ignorance in public. The Clarks are among the kindest, most thorough people I’ve ever met, and their yearly riding tutorials have made me the pretend but enormously willing (and safe) cowgirl I am. As far as I’m concerned, there is no better place to go for a Western vacation and no better people to spend it with.
Communication
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Outfitter Review
Home on the Range!
My husband and I spent an unforgettable week at the Broken Arrow Lodge. Nothing is fancy, but it's all really good: riding every day on good horses in gorgeous country; eating the best home cooking; hanging out on the front porch watching the hummingbirds; fishing for trout in the pond and on the Ruby River; going to the county fair or on a variety of outings; playing with Lois, the world's best dog; ... more and, most of all, being made to feel like family instead of guests. Erwin and Sherry Clark are warm and friendly hosts who are also great teachers for new and intermediate riders. If you have always wanted to be a cowboy or cowgirl, this is a great way to do it. You can watch the deer and the antelope play (we did), never hear a discouraging word and the skies won't be cloudy all day. Giddyap over to the Broken Arrow Lodge and start creating some unforgettable memories of your own.
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